Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Dec 2013 23:47 UTC
Windows

Mary Jo Foley has some information on the next wave of big Windows releases - scheduled for Spring 2015. This wave will supposedly bring the three Windowqs branches - Xbox, phone, PCs - more in line with each other.

The Xbox One OS, Windows 8.x OS and Windows Phone 8 OS already share a common Windows NT core. As we've heard before, Microsoft is working to deliver a single app store across its myriad Windows platforms. Company officials also are laboring to make the developer toolset for all three of these platforms more similar.

But Threshold will add another level of commonality across Microsoft's various Windows-based platforms, sources said. With the Threshold wave, Microsoft plans to support the same core set of "high value activities" across platforms. These high-value activities include expression/documents (Office, and the coming "Remix" digital storytelling app, I'd think); decision making/task completion (Bing, I'd assume); IT management (Intune and Workplace Join, perhaps?) and "serious fun."

The first bit seems like a no-brainer and should have been done already, but the second part seems like traditional Microsoft marketing nonsense. "High value activities"? Seriously? Could this be any more vague and meaningless?

Before Microsoft gets to Threshold, the company is on track to deliver an update to Windows 8.1 (known as Windows 8.1 Update 1) around the same time that it delivers Windows Phone "Blue" (Windows Phone 8.1). That's supposedly happening in the spring 2014/Q2 2014 timeframe, from what my sources have said.

With time frames like that it almost seems as if even Microsoft itself doesn't care.

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Normal delays in big corporations
by moondevil on Tue 3rd Dec 2013 09:23 UTC
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

With time frames like that it almost seems as if even Microsoft itself doesn't care.


Anyone that worked in companies of similar size, knows how hard is to move a ship in the middle of market problems and internal politics.

Upper management might care, the problem is to get all layers to move in the same direction.

Reply Score: 3

reduz Member since:
2006-02-25

My worry about Microsoft is their really slow development model. It took them ages to catch up to the iPhone and iPad and failed so far.

So what are they going to do at this point? Their only strength and the core of their business is Windows Desktop, and they themselves spent a fortune trying to make people to understand how obsolete it is (Windows 8), and 8.1 wasn't as successful at changing people's minds as was 7 was compared to Vista.

At the same time, with Ballmer resigning and without a new CEO yet, it will take them ages to lay out a new strategy and set it in motion.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I have been wondering about their lack of progress as well.

For example, WP was/is missing features that are common on other mobile systems. Stuff that's easy 'n' quick to add, yet it doesn't get done.

If Microsoft wants to win people's hearts (and money) wouldn't it be a great strategy to listen to the people and honor their requests?

I had a WP 7.5 phone, but when 7.8 arrived instead of getting VPN support more colored tiles. I can't imagine more people wanted extra "theme" colors than VPN support. I say "them", because Microsoft calls it so, while it's just another color for your tiles and a number don't even support it and stick to their own color.

With all the money, people and other recourses Microsoft should be able to move much faster. So to me it seems the problem isn't money, people and other recourses, but the organization itself.

Reply Parent Score: 4