Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 15th Dec 2013 11:05 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

PhoneArena's Micheal H. addresses an article at Forbes:

The conclusion may sound redundant at this point, but it is fairly simple: if you want to have a discussion about Android and iOS (and there are plenty of incredibly interesting discussions to be had), think about the issues you want to cover, and break each down on their own terms. Trying to bundle arguments under and umbrella term like "fragmentation" is just lazy and it holds very little meaning at this point.

At the end of the day, I always get the feeling that the people yelling the loudest about "fragmentation" are people on the sidelines, who've never coded for Android at all. That's not to say it's not a problem at all - it's just to say that it's an area where the competition does a better job. Android's device diversity certainly creates additional challenges for Android developers, much in the same way that Apple's inconsistent App Store policies creates additional challenges for iOS developers.

Each platform has its weaknesses, but none have been as aggressively made larger than it really seems to be than Android's supposed fragmentation. Unravelling this positive feedback loop among these bloggers should make for fascinating material.

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RE: From the sidelines?
by The123king on Sun 15th Dec 2013 15:32 UTC in reply to "From the sidelines?"
The123king
Member since:
2009-05-28

I've noticed this term, "Apple Fanboy" being bounced around a lot in recent years. The irony is that it's mostly used by people ingrained, or obsessed, with Windows and/or Android. IMHO it's just "fanboys" calling other "fanboys" "fanboys", just because their preferences are different to other peoples.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: From the sidelines?
by No it isnt on Sun 15th Dec 2013 16:17 in reply to "RE: From the sidelines?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Not at all. I couldn't care less about Windows or Android, but I do frequent a few tech sites, and Apple fanbois are a special kind of corporate fans who try to sell their brand at every opportunity. They practically destroyed Slashdot after OS X made Apple some geek cred.

I suppose Nelson is the equivalent Microsoft fan, and he's fairly unique.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: From the sidelines?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Sun 15th Dec 2013 18:26 in reply to "RE: From the sidelines?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

I've noticed this term, "Apple Fanboy" being bounced around a lot in recent years. The irony is that it's mostly used by people ingrained, or obsessed, with Windows and/or Android. IMHO it's just "fanboys" calling other "fanboys" "fanboys", just because their preferences are different to other peoples.


Ahem...

False equivalence is a logical fallacy which describes a situation where there is a logical and apparent equivalence, but when in fact there is none.
[...]
A common way for this fallacy to be perpetuated is one shared trait between two subjects is assumed to show equivalence, especially in order of magnitude, when equivalence is not necessarily the logical result.


Most "Windows advocates" tend to be developers or work in IT in some other capacity, so their preferences are based on technical knowledge - rather than mindlessly following technology fashion trends.

In contrast, Apple fanboys are more like obsessive sports fans with an undue emotional attachment to their favourite team - to the point where they believe "their team's" success somehow reflects positively on them. Actually, no, that's unfair to regular sports fans - Apple fanboys are more like obsessive WWE fans who constantly spout the catchphrases of their favourite wrestler.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: From the sidelines?
by phylos on Sun 15th Dec 2013 18:55 in reply to "RE[2]: From the sidelines?"
phylos Member since:
2013-12-15

Only people who work on IT and have more than basic knowledge are windows advocates? That is blatantly untrue.
For people who actually care about what OS they use enough to have discussions about it, there are more Windows "fanboys" with no knowledge or interest in technology than there are apple fanboys.
Granted, that is because there are many more actual windows users than OS X users but still.

Also, this might be my unix bias showing but I find the usage of the concepts "Windows advocates" and "people who work or know on IT" to describe the same group weirdly oxymoronic.

Edited 2013-12-15 18:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: From the sidelines?
by MichaelH on Mon 16th Dec 2013 02:09 in reply to "RE[2]: From the sidelines?"
MichaelH Member since:
2011-05-25

So:
People who like Windows are "advocates", technically knowledgable, and calmly rational.
People who like Macs OS or iOS are "fanboys", "obsessive", and similar to people who spout catch phrases from celebrities.
Yeah, you sound unbiased.
Whoops: just caught the BallmerKnowsBest nickname. Sorry to have fed the troll.

Edited 2013-12-16 02:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: From the sidelines?
by Tony Swash on Mon 16th Dec 2013 12:50 in reply to "RE[2]: From the sidelines?"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Most "Windows advocates" tend to be developers or work in IT in some other capacity, so their preferences are based on technical knowledge


There isn't a shred of evidence to support that statement.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I kinda sense this is a troll post based on your username. But I'm taking it seriously, to point out something not obvious.

If you do work in IT, and by IT I assume you mean, Enterprise Desktop management, then you really don't have much choice but to deal with Microsoft. Unless you are the head CTO honcho who actually makes decisions about what technology the enterprise will use, you can't really start moving the company away from Microsoft. A kind of stockholm syndrome sets in due to the Lock in and job security. If the company switches away form your core talents, you need to retrain.

So far from being a more informed individual basing their opinion on objective facts, I'd consider someone working in this environment to be a heavily biased individual.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: From the sidelines?
by JAlexoid on Mon 16th Dec 2013 18:05 in reply to "RE[2]: From the sidelines?"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Most "Windows advocates" tend to be developers or work in IT in some other capacity, so their preferences are based on technical knowledge - rather than mindlessly following technology fashion trends.


There are Windows advocates and there are "Windows advocates". The second bunch are fanboys that should get more experience in the field of IT.
Also, current generation of Microsoft fanboys are as annoying as Apple fanboys were at one point. OSNews is rather civilized, compared to other places... where developers are not the dominant demographic. And does the persecution complex shine there... Oh MY...

Reply Parent Score: 4