Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 15th Dec 2013 11:05 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

PhoneArena's Micheal H. addresses an article at Forbes:

The conclusion may sound redundant at this point, but it is fairly simple: if you want to have a discussion about Android and iOS (and there are plenty of incredibly interesting discussions to be had), think about the issues you want to cover, and break each down on their own terms. Trying to bundle arguments under and umbrella term like "fragmentation" is just lazy and it holds very little meaning at this point.

At the end of the day, I always get the feeling that the people yelling the loudest about "fragmentation" are people on the sidelines, who've never coded for Android at all. That's not to say it's not a problem at all - it's just to say that it's an area where the competition does a better job. Android's device diversity certainly creates additional challenges for Android developers, much in the same way that Apple's inconsistent App Store policies creates additional challenges for iOS developers.

Each platform has its weaknesses, but none have been as aggressively made larger than it really seems to be than Android's supposed fragmentation. Unravelling this positive feedback loop among these bloggers should make for fascinating material.

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RE: OK - so what is going on?
by aldo on Mon 16th Dec 2013 15:21 UTC in reply to "OK - so what is going on?"
aldo
Member since:
2010-02-17

There almost certainly factors at play, can anybody else suggest any?


Statistical cherrypicking by weird-ass Apple cultists?

Reply Parent Score: 6

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

"There almost certainly factors at play, can anybody else suggest any?


Statistical cherrypicking by weird-ass Apple cultists?
"

OK - fill in the missing stats left out by the "weird-ass Apple cultists".


Curious that you did not list "the measuring of user engagement is inherently flawed, because it usually only measures a very limited set of use cases". E.g., if you measure Facebook, Twitter, the NYT, CNN, and BBC - you're not getting China, Russia, and large other swaths of the world.

So, most likely, it's a combination of all of those - except fragmentation. That has no place in your list.


What I find weird is how some people are so rendered so uncomfortable by the disparity in platform usage between Android and iOS that that either actually claim it doesn't exist even though all statistics point to it being a real, easily measurable and persistent phenomena.

Thom your argument is like me claiming that there are several teapots orbiting the sun and saying there is no evidence to the contrary. It may be that there are large numbers of Android users who are very actively using their devices in China and Russia in ways that fail to show up in all metrics of platform use, if their usage does not show up in metrics then there is no way to disprove that. However if their use does not appear in any metrics how does their usage have any significance? If they don't surf, don't buy, don't use apps, don't click ads, don't do anything we commonly think of as platform use function then under what circumstances would their usage be of significance?

I tend to think the simpler explanation is the right one. The dog is not barking because it is not there.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

However if their use does not appear in any metrics how does their usage have any significance? If they don't surf, don't buy, don't use apps, don't click ads, don't do anything we commonly think of as platform use function then under what circumstances would their usage be of significance?


I don't think you understood my point. Their usage would not show up because the statistics you rely on are very western-oriented, and often even US-oriented, meaning that non-US, and non-western services are not taken into account. It's not that these people do NOT use their phone - it's that they do not use the services monitored by western and US analysts.

For instance, on my phone, I never browse to the sites or use the applications of: the BBC, CNN, or any other non-Dutch television channel, the New York Times or any other non-Dutch newspaper, and so on, and so forth. Yet, sites like this are often included by analysts - while local sites like NU.nl, NOS.nl and their applications are not. Thus, my Android usage would not show up at your analysts.

However, I am not using my phone any more or less than any average American. This effect would be infinitely stronger in more culturally different locations such as Russia, India, and especially China.

I'm not saying the analysts you cite are wrong or that my reason explains everything. You were asking for more reasons, and this is likely a very important contributing factor.

Reply Parent Score: 3

aldo Member since:
2010-02-17

Tony, you asked for suggestions, I gave you one. I'm not emotionally involved in the argument enough to try to massage any figures though, so I can't help you out there. You know in your heart that I'm right though, don't you?

Edited 2013-12-16 17:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

What I find weird is how some people are so rendered so uncomfortable by the disparity in platform usage...


It's not some people, it's you personally that is obsessed with it.

Reply Parent Score: 3