Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Dec 2013 20:47 UTC
Apple

Apple today announced the all-new Mac Pro will be available to order starting Thursday, December 19. Redesigned from the inside out, the all-new Mac Pro features the latest Intel Xeon processors, dual workstation-class GPUs, PCIe-based flash storage and ultra-fast ECC memory.

This thing is so damn awesome. I don't need it, but I still want one.

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RE[2]: Comment by v_bobok
by unclefester on Fri 20th Dec 2013 00:14 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by v_bobok"
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13


The Mac Pro's AMD FirePro D700 is the exact match to the AMD FirePro W9000. Amazon has the FirePro W9000 at $3,158. For $4k, you can buy a 3.7GHz quad core Mac Pro with dual D700 GPUs. That's more than $2K cheaper than the cost of the equivalent FirePro W9000 video cards alone for your "hackintosh."

Now, add on the costs of a motherboard and ~$300 Intel Xeon E5 CPU, ~$1100 worth of 12GB of 1866MHz DDR3 ECC RAM, 256GB PCIe-based flash storage (a SATA SSD is only half the speed, so that's not comparable), Thunderbolt 2 or comparable (20GB/s and up to 36 daisy-chained devices). Now, find a case and cooling system that's under 20dBA under load.


Just buy an i7, a crossfire motherboard, two high end gaming cards and regular RAM. The performance will be just as good. Workstation hardware is no faster for multimedia work.

There are plenty of cases and cooling soutions that can easily achieve 20dB under load.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by v_bobok
by fmaxwell on Fri 20th Dec 2013 01:35 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by v_bobok"
fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

Just buy an i7, a crossfire motherboard, two high end gaming cards and regular RAM. The performance will be just as good. Workstation hardware is no faster for multimedia work.


Core i7 CPUs don't handle ECC RAM, which is why you don't see them in servers or workstation class systems.

I realize that most consumers think that unbuffered, non-ECC RAM is fine and that there's no need for RAID storage. Most people in the market for workstations and servers would tend to disagree.

As to SLI consumer video cards, there is a significant bit of CAD and engineering software that won't even start up on it. In other cases, packages like Lightwave and Maya are achieving 2x-3x the framerate when running on the workstation GPU (compared to the equivalent consumer gaming GPU).

There are plenty of cases and cooling soutions that can easily achieve 20dB under load.

I have not found them. Most individual fans are louder than 20dBA.

Apparently, reviewers aren't used to computers at quiet as the 2013 Mac Pro. Tech Crunch ran an article entitled "Hands On: Apple’s New Mac Pro Is An Insanely Quiet Thermal Wizard." Tech Radar's review included "We were impressed at just how quiet the new Mac Pro is."

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by v_bobok
by unclefester on Fri 20th Dec 2013 04:12 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by v_bobok"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Core i7 CPUs don't handle ECC RAM, which is why you don't see them in servers or workstation class systems.

I realize that most consumers think that unbuffered, non-ECC RAM is fine and that there's no need for RAID storage. Most people in the market for workstations and servers would tend to disagree.


A Mac pro is not going to be used for mission critical engineering design, mathematical simulations or as a server by any sane professional.

Workstations use ECC RAM and workstation grade cards primarily for piece of mind and legal indemnity - not performance.

As to SLI consumer video cards, there is a significant bit of CAD and engineering software that won't even start up on it.


This is because the software manufacturer effectively offers legal indemnity for use in mission critical design situations such as aircraft and large-scale structural design. They are stating that their software is only guaranteed to work correctly when combined with certain hardware. The software checks that is using the "correct" hardware at startup to protect the software company against lawsuits.

Many CAD applications such as AutoCAD will run perfectly on consumer grade hardware. My brother is surveyor/civil engineer for a large government body. They replaced all their workstations over 20 years ago with whitebox PCs because none of their CAD work (surveying, unpaved access roads and minor earth works) is considered risky or mission critical.

You can buy a $2 engine bolt form an auto parts store that is absolutely identical to an $800 aircraft bolt. The only difference is the aircraft bolt comes comes with paperwork certifying it for aviation use and offering legal indemnity against defects. In other words you pay $2 for the aircraft bolt and $798 "insurance" against defects.


Apparently, reviewers aren't used to computers at quiet as the 2013 Mac Pro. Tech Crunch ran an article entitled "Hands On: Apple’s New Mac Pro Is An Insanely Quiet Thermal Wizard." Tech Radar's review included "We were impressed at just how quiet the new Mac Pro is."


The ambient noise in a very quiet office is >40dB. The noise levels in a normal office frequently exceed 65dB.

My 8yo AMD 4000+ machine (Antec Sonata case and a quiet modular PSU) can only be heard by placing your ear directly against the case. Since the case in under the desk this is a moot argument anyway.

Only pretentious wankers (~90+% of Apple users) put a workstation on top of the desk.

Edited 2013-12-20 04:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3