Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Jan 2014 10:06 UTC
Windows

Paul Thurrott on the next version of Windows and the future of the platform.

In some ways, the most interesting thing about Threshold is how it recasts Windows 8 as the next Vista. It's an acknowledgment that what came before didn't work, and didn't resonate with customers. And though Microsoft will always be able to claim that Windows 9 wouldn't have been possible without the important foundational work they had done first with Windows 8 - just as was the case with Windows 7 and Windows Vista - there's no way to sugarcoat this. Windows 8 has set back Microsoft, and Windows, by years, and possibly for good.

With even Paul Thurrott claiming Windows is in trouble, it becomes virtually impossible to deny it is so.

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RE[4]: Aggregation
by sbenitezb on Mon 13th Jan 2014 14:16 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Aggregation"
sbenitezb
Member since:
2005-07-22

I haven't seen ANY interesting thing happening on the mobile platforms (or any platforms) for years. There's hardly new stuff, just old ideas improved (which is ok). Mobile got all the hipe but it's going to end as mobile computing inherently sucks. There's not much else to put in a phone. We already got a gps, a text messenger and a gaming console.

I've had plenty of mobile toys to play with since about 15 years ago; they have advanced a lot in functionality, but usability is and has always been total crap (compared to a desktop computer/notebook).

I think we have already got more than enough computing power and easy of use in the desktops/laptops that probably don't need much more advances in these areas. OS X is as perfect as you could ask for, Windows is always two steps forward, one/two step backwards and will always suck as long as it isn't *unix inside, Linux got some interesting future for gaming and eventually desktop, if Valve's Steam Boxes do well.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Aggregation
by WereCatf on Mon 13th Jan 2014 14:32 in reply to "RE[4]: Aggregation"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I haven't seen ANY interesting thing happening on the mobile platforms (or any platforms) for years.


Maybe you should open your eyes. There's been plenty of interesting stuff happening all around us, what with Oculus VR, wearable computing, NLS speech recognition, holographic interfaces and so on.

Mobile got all the hipe but it's going to end as mobile computing inherently sucks.


I'd say you just lack imagination. Mobile computing could be exceedingly powerful in the future with better speech recognition, visual object identification, mixed virtual/real-world interfaces, even neural input -- it may not be suitable for the same things e.g. a desktop is, but then again neither is a hammer suited for the same job as a pickaxe, and yet they're both useful. And who knows, maybe one day mobile devices can just be popped in a dock and have them transform into desktop computing platforms, blurring the distinction altogether?

OS X is as perfect as you could ask for, Windows is always two steps forward, one/two step backwards and will always suck as long as it isn't *unix inside


You know what they say about opinions and assholes...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Aggregation
by sbenitezb on Mon 13th Jan 2014 14:50 in reply to "RE[5]: Aggregation"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Maybe you should open your eyes. There's been plenty of interesting stuff happening all around us, what with Oculus VR, wearable computing, NLS speech recognition, holographic interfaces and so on.


Holographic interfaces are interesting. Wearable computing is crap very little people will use. Speech recognition is nothing new; it has improved in the last 20 years but not that much that makes it useful. And even if it was useful, people won't go by talking to their phone and hope it understands correctly all they say. It may work for english (a simplistic language) half the time.

About Oculus VR, you might think it's some new idea, but is as old as more than 10 years and never took off. I've see reality glasses before (and even a FPS game), but if that's what you think is interesting, you have very low standards.

I'd say you just lack imagination. Mobile computing could be exceedingly powerful in the future with better speech recognition, visual object identification, mixed virtual/real-world interfaces, even neural input --


I think you have too much imagination if you think all that augmented reality crap is going to make people use it and love it. 3D TVs are a flop, there you might have some interesting facts about what people like. We already have proper 3D in real life. We don't need a replacement. Or you think most played games are all 3D with fancy graphics and hardware? Think again, Candy Crash and stupid farm games are what people like. People like simple, and 2D works fine for most of us. 3D gadgets are nothing new or interesting anymore.

And who knows, maybe one day mobile devices can just be popped in a dock and have them transform into desktop computing platforms, blurring the distinction altogether?


This already happened. Nothing new and didn't work. Maybe it is not time yet.

You know what they say about opinions and assholes...


Yeah, tell me something I don't know and surprise me. You write opinions too.

Edited 2014-01-13 14:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Aggregation
by moondevil on Mon 13th Jan 2014 21:55 in reply to "RE[4]: Aggregation"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Windows is always two steps forward, one/two step backwards and will always suck as long as it isn't *unix inside


It started as VMS inside.

Given that UNIX own creators already tried to create a better UNIX, being UNIX inside might not be that great.

Edited 2014-01-13 21:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Aggregation
by acobar on Tue 14th Jan 2014 18:47 in reply to "RE[5]: Aggregation"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Given that UNIX own creators already tried to create a better UNIX, being UNIX inside might not be that great.


What is your point, please?

For all I know, the intent of plan9 was to go even deeper on the concept of "everything is a file" than unix did.

And about heritage, it should be clear to everybody that works on this field that there is a lot of cross-pollination between the current main systems and their ancestors, and I am not only talking about the direct ones. Useful concepts should, and are, "copied" outside their origins and as so we see unix concepts on Microsoft systems and conversely and it is actually a good thing. Why anyone wants to demand the reinvention of the wheel is something that really makes no sense at all (I am not talking about you specifically on this).

Reply Parent Score: 3