Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Jan 2014 10:06 UTC
Windows

Paul Thurrott on the next version of Windows and the future of the platform.

In some ways, the most interesting thing about Threshold is how it recasts Windows 8 as the next Vista. It's an acknowledgment that what came before didn't work, and didn't resonate with customers. And though Microsoft will always be able to claim that Windows 9 wouldn't have been possible without the important foundational work they had done first with Windows 8 - just as was the case with Windows 7 and Windows Vista - there's no way to sugarcoat this. Windows 8 has set back Microsoft, and Windows, by years, and possibly for good.

With even Paul Thurrott claiming Windows is in trouble, it becomes virtually impossible to deny it is so.

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RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by lucas_maximus on Mon 13th Jan 2014 18:24 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I haven't actually met anyone in person that complains as much as people do on the internet.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by allanregistos on Tue 14th Jan 2014 01:20 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

I haven't actually met anyone in person that complains as much as people do on the internet.

I guess you WANT TO meet me and tell you and teach you where Windows 8 falls? It's a downgrade from Windows 7, up to the DOS era.

I've meet a user who is satisfied with Windows 8, my co-worker, but it doesn't mean, from my perspective, everyone should be OK with Windows 8.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by lucas_maximus on Tue 14th Jan 2014 09:15 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I guess you WANT TO meet me and tell you and teach you where Windows 8 falls? It's a downgrade from Windows 7, up to the DOS era.


No not really. The hardest thing is remember where the shutdown button is. The metro apps are a bit shit, but that the apps not the interface itself.

I a .NET dev, and I seen other than some .NET compatibility issues, other than that everything works and the only difference in the start screen is the presentation (it essentially works the same via keyboard).

Everything works fine with the odd exception (normally something dev related).

I've meet a user who is satisfied with Windows 8, my co-worker, but it doesn't mean, from my perspective, everyone should be OK with Windows 8.


I never said that, I just never seen what the fuss was about because I don't have a problem being primarily these days a Windows 7 and iPad user.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by looncraz on Tue 14th Jan 2014 21:05 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
looncraz Member since:
2005-07-24

I haven't actually met anyone in person that complains as much as people do on the internet.


Is your business in procuring or building computers for people?

I've received dozens (if not a hundred, by now) calls from people who bought a new computer with Windows 8 and they think something is wrong with it because "This stupid program keeps coming up and covering my whole screen when I try to do something - my desktop disappears and I get this weird colored mess." First time I heard it, I thought they were talking about video artifacts so I told them to take the computer back and get a replacement - which did the exact same thing. It was only after that when I realized it was Windows 8's start menu confusing them.

Oh... and you DO NOT want to know how many people called me to figure out how to login to their computer... or to shut it down... Thankfully, I walk them through getting to a browser and downloading a program I setup on my server to take full control of their computer - then I install Start8 and a few other utilities to make it more like Windows 7.

I still get complaints about how flat everything looks - people are accustomed to being able to see '3d' boundaries on buttons and controls... taking those way and making them flat makes people think they are broken. Stardock must be loving it!

Reply Parent Score: 6

v RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by lucas_maximus on Tue 14th Jan 2014 21:47 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by acobar on Tue 14th Jan 2014 21:48 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Man, we share the same crazy experience on that. It is surreal.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by phobox on Wed 15th Jan 2014 13:30 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
phobox Member since:
2011-12-07

Without wishing to sound rude (but realising I probably do anyway), all this tells me is that generally speaking people are morons and are incapable of accepting change in any form, at least the people you've clearly had to deal with anyway. Most of the non-tech people Ive spoken to about Windows 8 found the experience jarring at first due to the change, but fairly quickly got used to it and in fact the majority began to prefer the experience.

Personally I still think the Win8 'modern' UI has a way to go, especially with regards to the quality of the apps. It just isnt there yet and simply cant serve as an adequate replacement for the desktop, not unless all you do all day is browse web pages... and even then I'd argue its not good enough. That being said the modern UI does work very well with touch enabled devices, extremely well in fact. And even on my desktop machine (traditional keyboard/mouse) I find the Start Screen and apps complimentary to my primary way of working which is the desktop (with Start8).

Like it or not the way consumers use devices is changing and Microsoft's answer to that in the form of Win8's modern UI and more importantly the principles it represents, is a good if not great move. For those of us who need more, the desktop is still there just as its always been and will remain so.

Reply Parent Score: 2