Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Jan 2014 10:06 UTC
Windows

Paul Thurrott on the next version of Windows and the future of the platform.

In some ways, the most interesting thing about Threshold is how it recasts Windows 8 as the next Vista. It's an acknowledgment that what came before didn't work, and didn't resonate with customers. And though Microsoft will always be able to claim that Windows 9 wouldn't have been possible without the important foundational work they had done first with Windows 8 - just as was the case with Windows 7 and Windows Vista - there's no way to sugarcoat this. Windows 8 has set back Microsoft, and Windows, by years, and possibly for good.

With even Paul Thurrott claiming Windows is in trouble, it becomes virtually impossible to deny it is so.

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RE[3]: So it's true... !
by lemur2 on Tue 14th Jan 2014 10:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: So it's true... !"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

There is a vast amount of (very expensive) critical software for architecture, engineering, mathematics, science and business use that only runs on Windows. It is unlikely to ever be ported to any other platform. MS could charge $5000 per licence and customers would still pay.


Only those few customers who had such a specialist application. The vast majority of users are very well catered for with a modern Linux desktop. A number of organisations have now moved to desktop Linux, it is entirely possible to do these days.

If a larger percentage of non-specialist desktop users started running the Linux desktop, as some organisations have already done, then the vendors of specialist applications would start releasing Linux versions.

Indeed, some have already done so:
http://www.bricsys.com/en_INTL/bricscad/features/
http://www.bricsys.com/common/news.jsp?item=502

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: So it's true... !
by unclefester on Wed 15th Jan 2014 03:14 in reply to "RE[3]: So it's true... !"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Only those few customers who had such a specialist application. The vast majority of users are very well catered for with a modern Linux desktop. A number of organisations have now moved to desktop Linux, it is entirely possible to do these days.


Virtually all small businesses run specialist Windows-only software for accounting, payroll, databases, practice management etc. [eg my hairdresser has a salon management system which automatically sends and receives SMS messages for confirming bookings.] This software must be fully customised for local (Australian) business conditions. In the vast majority of cases there are no high quality Linux or Mac alternatives.

The vast majority of modern scientific instruments have Windows interfaces.


If a larger percentage of non-specialist desktop users started running the Linux desktop, as some organisations have already done, then the vendors of specialist applications would start releasing Linux versions.


If you're paying $10k per licence for AutoCAD you're not going to worry about saving a few bucks runnning Linux. [/q]



Bricad is not considered a replacement for AutoCAD. It is far cheaper to buy a licence than it is to fully retrain someone on a new piece of software.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: So it's true... !
by Bobthearch on Wed 15th Jan 2014 19:52 in reply to "RE[3]: So it's true... !"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

Only those few customers who had such a specialist application. The vast majority of users are very well catered for with a modern Linux desktop. A number of organisations have now moved to desktop Linux, it is entirely possible to do these days.


My recent experiences with consumer products indicate otherwise:
Software included with Nikon cameras is Windows or Mac only.
The CD that comes with Canon cameras does not include Linux software either. Funny thing about Canon, when browsing their software online Linux is one of the OS choices in the drop down menu. But if you click it, "There is no software for the OS Version you selected." But at least they acknowledge there is such a thing. ;)
Software for Texas Instruments calculators is Windows or Mac only.
Celestron telescope software is Windows-only.
Fuse software for Fender guitar amps, Windows or Mac.

Those are a few of my recent encounters. Admittedly, Celestron telescopes aren't in every home, and neither are Fender amps. But Canon and Nikon? As mainstream as it gets.

Linux has come a long way with PC component manufacturers (motherboards, video cards, modems, etc.), but when it comes to getting Linux CDs distributed alongside Windows and Mac software with everyday consumer products, it may as well still be 1998.

Sure, sure, you can sometimes find replacement software titles, run a virtual Windows OS, or seek out Linux-friendly products. Just like in 1998...

Unclefester's comment:
The vast majority of modern scientific instruments have Windows interfaces.

I get a kick out of the engineers and their beautiful expensive iMacs... running Windows XP. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: So it's true... !
by Bobthearch on Thu 16th Jan 2014 00:56 in reply to "RE[3]: So it's true... !"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

One of the other electronic items I purchased recently is a Galaxy Player running the Android operating system. And even the desktop software included with that is Windows-only. Ditto the sync software for a Galaxy Tab bought last year. The irony of Linux-based appliances being sold with Windows-only software...

Only other thing I can think of that I've purchased recently, a new Garmin GPS. Garmin has recently begun creating Mac versions of all new GPS-desktop and mapping software. But still nothing for Linux users.

Edited 2014-01-16 00:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2