Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Jan 2014 23:08 UTC, submitted by jz
OpenBSD

See the email thread on the misc list for more details.

In light of shrinking funding, we do need to look for a source to cover project expenses. If need be the OpenBSD Foundation can be involved in receiving donations to cover project electrical costs.

But the fact is right now, OpenBSD will shut down if we do not have the funding to keep the lights on.

If you or a company you know are able to assist us, it would be greatly appreciated, but right now we are looking at a significant funding shortfall for the upcoming year - Meaning the project won't be able to cover 20 thousand dollars in electrical expenses before being able to use money for other things. That sort of situation is not sustainable.

The OpenBSD project is the incubator for a number of other projects including OpenSSH and OpenSMTPD. If you use these or just want the project to survive, consider making a donation.

Thread beginning with comment 580851
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Funding
by robertojdohnert on Fri 17th Jan 2014 04:27 UTC
robertojdohnert
Member since:
2005-07-12

Some people dont understand that if you try and be a pure open source project, you can only rely on what few little things you sell. This includes CD sets, t-shirts and also donations. Thats the only way you can keep running without direct funding by any type of company or corporate entity. Some people see "sponsor" and they think huge amounts of money changes hands and thats not the case in all scenarios. Running a project like this myself, and I wish them the best of luck.

Roberto J. Dohnert
Head Developer
Black Lab Linux Project
http://www.blacklablinux.org

Reply Score: 3

RE: Funding
by Alfman on Fri 17th Jan 2014 06:56 in reply to "Funding"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

robertojdohnert,

Yea, I stopped maintaining my own linux distro a while ago. Each dependency was built from source using an automated build process. When I needed a new program, I'd add it to the build. I learned a tremendous amount in doing it, but it consumed alot of time and I wasn't getting paid to do it. I would have continued it as a hobby, but after having a second child I lost the free time I used to have.

Being able to maintain your own OS impresses lots of people, but when it really comes down to it, it's quite difficult to find a market for that kind of work.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Funding
by allanregistos on Fri 17th Jan 2014 07:49 in reply to "RE: Funding"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

robertojdohnert,

Yea, I stopped maintaining my own linux distro a while ago. Each dependency was built from source using an automated build process. When I needed a new program, I'd add it to the build. I learned a tremendous amount in doing it, but it consumed alot of time and I wasn't getting paid to do it. I would have continued it as a hobby, but after having a second child I lost the free time I used to have.

Being able to maintain your own OS impresses lots of people, but when it really comes down to it, it's quite difficult to find a market for that kind of work.


What's the name of your distro? I am just curious. Anyway, I think you can put it in you resume to impress potential employers. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Funding
by allanregistos on Fri 17th Jan 2014 08:07 in reply to "Funding"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

Some people dont understand that if you try and be a pure open source project, you can only rely on what few little things you sell. This includes CD sets, t-shirts and also donations. Thats the only way you can keep running without direct funding by any type of company or corporate entity. Some people see "sponsor" and they think huge amounts of money changes hands and thats not the case in all scenarios. Running a project like this myself, and I wish them the best of luck.

Roberto J. Dohnert
Head Developer
Black Lab Linux Project
http://www.blacklablinux.org


I have a suggestion. At least for me, it can be disappointing to hear a distro listing several DEs or supports several desktop environments at once. This is just one example of wasting resources on the part of the distro developer. I think a developer needs only to focus on one desktop environment and promotes it so there is no wasted energy on other DEs.

As a user, it is not really the desktop that matters most, what matters is the application availability and development tools. We need it to work on something is very important than we need a beautiful KDE desktop.

In my specific case, I need to install a Linux distro in a business environment. This should be the focus of Linux desktops, business, optimize your Linux desktop for business use, so what you use in your business, will naturally will be used in your homes too. (See Microsoft Windows). If your Linux desktop is not usable in business, then sorry, I cannot promote your Linux desktop, that is why, still, I am using Ubuntu in spite of the problems.

Another specific business case, Microsoft Office is really needed in an office environment, so a distro that installs Microsoft Office seamlessly with the aid of Wine with no Internet hoping reading tutorials here and there really makes sense than supporting all the Unix Desktop environments on the planet...

Regards,
Allan

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Funding
by robertojdohnert on Fri 17th Jan 2014 18:11 in reply to "RE: Funding"
robertojdohnert Member since:
2005-07-12

We only support 2 Desktop environments, XFCE and KDE. On our Enterprise focused distro we only roll KDE now.

Roberto J. Dohnert
Head Developer
Black Lab Linux
http://www.blacklablinux.org

Reply Parent Score: 0

Wow
by spammesilly on Fri 17th Jan 2014 13:04 in reply to "Funding"
spammesilly Member since:
2011-10-15

@robertojdohnert - Never heard of your distribution. Just checked it out and it looks great and am downloading it now.

BTW - Just bought an OpenBSD t-shirt to support the project. I don't use OpenBSD anymore but still use OpenSSH daily. Thanks Theo and team!

Reply Parent Score: 2