Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Jan 2014 11:54 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

Nokia has just posted its results for the fourth quarter of 2013 - this is the last set of quarterly results which include the devices division, which has been sold to Microsoft. The parts that remain at Nokia are doing relatively well, but the holiday quarter for Lumia was a letdown.

Exactly how much of a letdown we can't say, since Nokia has - curiously, but tellingly - stopped reporting Lumia sales (update: Nokia has confirmed it sold 8.2 million Lumias). However, they do state that Lumia sales in the fourth (holiday) quarter were down from the third quarter, but up from the year-ago quarter, meaning they sold anywhere between 4.4 and 8.8 million Lumias during the holiday quarter of 2013. Tweakers' Arnoud Wokke has done the math, and concludes Nokia sold between 7.55 and 7.98 million Lumias (update: Nokia has confirmed it sold 8.2 million Lumias). Average selling price dropped again, most likely due to the popularity of the low-end 520. This gives Nokia a smartphone market share of about 2-3%.

All in all, the devices division, with its crashing Asha sales and struggling Lumia sales, was a clear stone around Nokia's neck, kept somewhat afloat by cash injections from Microsoft. However, those injections apparently weren't enough, and by now, we can conclude that Microsoft was effectively forced to step in and buy Nokia's devices division - lest someone else do it.

With this being the last quarter in which Nokia reports on its devices division, an era has come to an end. Now it's up to Microsoft to try and see if they can make something out of the Lumia brand - however, without the Nokia name, that's going to be a very tough sell.

Just ask the Surface department.

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RE[3]: Comment by Nelson
by Vanders on Thu 23rd Jan 2014 15:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Nelson"
Vanders
Member since:
2005-07-06

If Microsoft were to launch an Android handset, it would likely be a bullet in the head for WP. Even if Microsoft don't intend it to be, I suspect that the market and app developers would see it as a sign that Microsoft don't have faith in WP as a platform, and react accordingly.

I'd expect them to plug on with WP, possibly even launching WP9, before they re-evaluate their strategy.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by Nelson
by Nelson on Thu 23rd Jan 2014 17:33 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Nelson"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I don't think so, if they limit it strictly to device categories traditionally suited for Asha. It wouldn't be an Android smartphone as much as itd be an Asha dumbphone of sorts.

I've seen some leaked screen shots and it seems to look a lot like Metro for WP, moreso than Asha today, and the base is probably more workable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Nelson
by Fergy on Thu 23rd Jan 2014 23:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Nelson"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

If Microsoft were to launch an Android handset, it would likely be a bullet in the head for WP.

They might get Elop to replace Balmer so it is a very likely chance.
;)

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by Nelson
by cdude on Fri 24th Jan 2014 10:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Nelson"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

it would likely be a bullet in the head for WP

Thing is that bullet is already in the head of WP and its mission impossible to remove it the way they tried. As Bill Gates answered in an interview some time ago: "that strategy failed". The news is that Bill Gates is still chairman of Microsoft, Mister WP - the Ballmer - gone, its changing. Its going to change drastical. Not just W7=>WP8=WP9 upgrade-like with more marketing dollar and a removed RT suffix plus smaller, more colorful tiles.

I suspect that the market and app developers would see it as a sign that Microsoft don't have faith in WP as a platform, and react accordingly.

WP has an own ecosystem. War of ecosystems it was. That war was lost for WP. It would be overall silly to continue a war you lost and there is not much to gain by collecting more bullets in your head.

An alternate strategy may to adapt. Take Android, extend and integrate it into your own ecosystem, compatibility where needed and platform lock-in by incompatibility where wanted.

Edited 2014-01-24 10:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2