Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 27th Jan 2014 00:02 UTC
Legal

Ingrid Lunden explains the significance of the deal (I dislike her headline though, since it falsely implies Google and Samsung were at legal odds):

First, the deal will bolster both Samsung and Google's patent positions against patent infringement allegations and subsequent litigation from competitors, and specifically Apple, which has been involved in acrimonious, multinational patent battles worth billions of dollars against Samsung for years now, over Samsung's Android-powered range of Galaxy smartphones and tablets.

Second, it is a sign of how Google continues to put the patents it gained from its $12.5 billion Motorola acquisition to good use across the Android ecosystem. The ecosystem part is key here. I personally wouldn’t be surprised to see deals like this one appear with other OEMs.

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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

The US is clearly a special case - the only country stupid enough to allow complex patent cases to be handled by a random group of idiots (i.e., people like us) instead of proper judges and specialists. No surprise it's the only country where Apple has scored a decisive victory.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

A judge can overturn a jury if the intent of the law is not taken into consideration on the verdict, or if mistakes are made like in Apple v. Samsung.

For all the anti-Jury saber rattling, Judge Koh actually reduced damages and scheduled a retrial (something you reported on) which Apple later won (something you did not report on).

Samsung also never requested a bench trial, for example like Microsoft did vs Moto.

Here's Groklaw criticizing Microsoft for not taking a jury trial:

http://www.groklaw.net/articlebasic.php?story=20130308212507920

Reply Parent Score: 3

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Does not negate the fact that jury trials are a medieval, error-prone relic - especially for high-profile cases or complicated stuff like patent cases. Most of the civilised world has evolved beyond them - thankfully.

Reply Parent Score: 2

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

The US is clearly a special case - the only country stupid enough to allow complex patent cases to be handled by a random group of idiots

Why do you believe US is stupid? If anything, US is evil. I see big corporations winning against small companies and US companies wining against non-US companies, almost all the time.

Reply Parent Score: 2