Linked by M.Onty on Mon 3rd Feb 2014 19:33 UTC
Games

A few days ago I inadvertently caused a bit of a fuss. In writing about GOG's Time Machine sale, I expressed my two minds about the joy of older games being rescued from obscurity, and my desire that they be in the public domain. This led to some really superb discussion about the subject in the comments below, and indeed to a major developer on Twitter to call for me to be fired.

I wanted to expand on my thoughts.

Fascinating article on Rock Paper Shotgun from John Walker on why he thinks software copyright (and possibly other kinds too) should come with a much shorter shelf life. Although ostensibly about videogames, much of it could be said to apply to recent events in mobile OS development too.

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protomank
Member since:
2006-08-03

Also, a short copyright would be an INCENTIVE for her to keep creating new and better stuff instead of living from maybe just one only hit as happens sometimes with a singer, for example.

Edited 2014-02-04 10:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

The argument applied to music is particulary funny because the fact is out of all the artists and bands all over the world only a minuscule percentage actually see any return for the music they create.

Everyone would like to make a living out of what they love doing, but being doomed to nothing but releasing free demos isn't stopping people from creating yet more songs, is it?

Reply Parent Score: 4

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

The argument applied to music is particulary funny because the fact is out of all the artists and bands all over the world only a minuscule percentage actually see any return for the music they create.

If this were about the early to maybe mid-90's, that would be true in regards to single/album sales only. However, around that time is when independent distribution became viable for the average artist. A ton of artists made piles of cash going that route and they did it with unimpressive sales numbers. An average artist with a typical 50/50 deal would get about $4 per unit. You're at $40k selling just 10,000 units, not including what you take from doing shows & merchandise.

Aside of that, it's grossly misleading to say "artists and bands all over the world only a minuscule percentage actually see any return for the music they create". Until 360 deals came about, artists may not make anything from sales but they could make plenty touring, merchandising, endorsement deals, etc. All of which only exist because of the music they create and therefore can be directly attributed to it.

The truth is most people not directly involved in the music industry have a lot of misconceptions about it which simply aren't true. That's what happens when you don't know the full picture, or don't understand it.

Reply Parent Score: 2