Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Feb 2014 14:21 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

Gionee has announced what the company claims is the thinnest smartphone in the world. Aside from boasting the most impressive 5.55mm waistline, the Elife S5.5 runs an Android-based Amigo OS, sports an octa-core 1.7 GHz processor, 2GB of RAM and a duo of 13 MP and 5 MP cameras (back and front).

I've already made the jump to Chinese smartphones early last year, and with still zero complaints about the Find 5, I have no intention of ever going back. Here, too, Gionee, shows that the stereotype we have here of Chinese devices being nothing but clones is starting to get very, very outdated. Influenced by lobbying from western companies, our governments will do all they can to block the influx of Chinese devices for as long as they can, but it won't take long for consumer demand for high-quality devices at low prices to overcome that.

Chinese companies like Oppo, Huawei, Xaomi, and others will do to the device market what Japanese and later South-Korean car brands have done to the car market. If I were a Korean, Japanese, or American device maker - I'd be worried.

Also, I totally want this phone. Beautiful.

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bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

You sir pulled the racism card when he said he didn't trust phone made by Chinese companies, not me. I rightly pointed out it does not have a thing to do with race, just as it wouldn't have a thing to do with race if he said he didn't trust companies run in NK or Putin's Russia.

When we have countless evidence that the state is 100% in control of the major tech companies over there AND have a vested interest in trying to steal secrets? Its not racist to point out that the hardware and our software might be compromised.

Hell I'm an American and not ashamed to admit when it comes to networking equipment I'd trust something made in Japan or the EU a hell of a lot quicker than I would trust something made in the USA. Does that make me racist or anti-American? No it just makes me able to read the headlines, just as I'm sure the other guy read all about the "pre-pwned" routers and other gear coming from China.

So don't be so quick to throw the race card, especially where it has no merit. An authoritarian regime knows no race after all, it only knows control.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

When you live in the biggest glass house in the neighborhood (NSA Land), going around throwing stones is rather hypocritical.

Now, who knows. Maybe this device has a backdoor which sends your sexting straight to some dark room in Beijing. But that's still in the realm of speculation. Whereas we have known for a while that your sexting can and is being intercepted and stored somewhere in Utah, to be read by some all American analyst in Maryland at their discretion. (I recommend you actually read the articles, not just the headlines to get a grasp of things).

The key here is which nation(s) the previous poster decided to give the benefit of the doubt and which one was indicted automatically. Specially given how just about every cell phone (the product category pertaining this article) sold in the West is made in China. Yet "concern" only popped up the minute one such device carried a Chinese sounding brand name.


Now, I'm not saying it's done consciously, xenophobia rarely is. But people learn and grow when their mistakes are pointed out. That's at least how I did it. And yes, you are free to just let dissonance get the best of you and continue with the argument about the side of the shit with the peanut having a worse smell than the part with corn in it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

When you live in the biggest glass house in the neighborhood (NSA Land), going around throwing stones is rather hypocritical.

Now, who knows. Maybe this device has a backdoor which sends your sexting straight to some dark room in Beijing. But that's still in the realm of speculation. Whereas we have known for a while that your sexting can and is being intercepted and stored somewhere in Utah, to be read by some all American analyst in Maryland at their discretion.


Wow. I don't think I could come up with a better example of the fallacy of false equivalence, even if I deliberately set out to write one.

(I recommend you actually read the articles, not just the headlines to get a grasp of things).


If you think that concern over products from Chinese tech companies is limited to "oh noes, someone might read my horny text messages," then you might want to try following your own advice.

The key here is which nation(s) the previous poster decided to give the benefit of the doubt and which one was indicted automatically.


No one said anything about giving any country the benefit of the doubt - or mentioned the US at all before you leapt to that assumption. Of course, when you're so obviously determined to hop up on your soap box and indulge in some self-righteous posturing, a little thing like having to put words in people's mouths isn't much of a barrier.

Reply Parent Score: 2