Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 3rd Mar 2014 10:44 UTC
In the News

A new tipping point in the world of tablets: today the analysts at Gartner have released their tablet sales numbers for 2013, and Android has topped the list for the most popular platform for the first time, outselling Appleā€™s range of iPad tablets nearly twofold. Of the 195 million tablets sold in 2013, Android took nearly 62% of sales on 121 million tablets, while Apple sold 70 million iPad tablets for a 36% share.

In comparison, last year, Apple led the tablet category with nearly 53% of sales on 61 million units, compared to Android at nearly 46% with 53 million tablets sold.

This was always inevitable. Apple won't mind though - they're still raking in the profits.

Thread beginning with comment 583791
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

i don't think there is a need to defend it as although android is beating Apple in market share (which was inevitable) the core difference between the Windows / Mac os the late 80's early 90's is that Apple is still making stacks and stacks of cash.

It is still important to note that apple is still selling more and more of these devices every year and pulling in massive profits because of it.

What we're really seeing is that the tablet market is being spaced out, we will likely see a plateu in the future but at the moment the market is still expanding.

I own all three major OS tablets, i own an iPad3 which is still really quick and powerful for my uses, plays HD content without a stammer and all apps run fine (evernote), the only reason i would upgrade to an iPad Air is if i still traveled a lot as the air is a lot lighter than the iPad3 which makes a difference in your bag.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

They do make an insane amount of money, making me wonder why they just don't lower the prices somewhat.

A lot of money is made selling apps and content, so why not make some less on the hardware sales, but make more selling content and use those numbers to get even more content providers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

DeadFishMan Member since:
2006-01-09

They do make an insane amount of money, making me wonder why they just don't lower the prices somewhat.

A lot of money is made selling apps and content, so why not make some less on the hardware sales, but make more selling content and use those numbers to get even more content providers.


THIS! Apple makes so much money as a content provider that they could easily afford a small cut in their hardware profits just to get more units out there to improve their marketshare and generate even more recurring business.

They can rest in their laurels for now but how long before their hardware competitors start striking deals with content providers (Amazon, recording companies, broadcasting networks, book publishers, etc.) just to sweeten their pill?

Marketshare is an important metric if they are to stay in the game for the long run.

Reply Parent Score: 4

DeadFishMan Member since:
2006-01-09

I agree with you to some extent. Apple is still raking the profits for the time being. But some people on this site and elsewhere are known for disregarding Android's market/mind share completely as if it do not matter in the long term game.

As the article accurately points out, the people for whom the brand on their devices matter pretty much got one already and are probably going to upgrade it next year at best because they're faithful to the brand - which is something that Apple cultivates and do it very well - so there is some recurring business potential in there.

For everybody else, who are more likely to be a little more price sensitive and I'd hazard to count as the majority, Android different devices, form factors and features probably makes more sense. And in the end, strong ecosystems will be a cause of network effect.

We're already seeing it happening in front of our very eyes as we speak. Even Apple itself sees it: the iPad mini clearly was a reaction to that.

The US and European markets are mature already. The growth will be in developing markets such as Asia, Russia and Latin America which are all markets being targetted by Apple's competitors.

And the days that only Apple came out with the good stuff whilst everybody else was putting out crappy devices are long gone.

I believe that what will keep Apple afloat for some time is the fact that its users are not averse to spend some money but that is not enough to sustain a healthy business for them if their marketshare continues to slip at this pace just like it happened back in the 80's and 90's.

Which is the analogy I was getting at and hence as I said before, history has a funny way of repeating itself.

Reply Parent Score: 4