Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 9th Mar 2014 17:35 UTC
Microsoft

Not too many people will recall the short-lived era of the "MSX" initiative which was slated to pretty much take over the non-existent middle world where consumer electronics met personal computers. It was always believed, back then, that this is where the sweet spot of profits would emerge. What emerged was instead laughable MSX. It was one of Microsoft's greatest flops.

The MSX was one of the first computers I ever used. I did basic BASIC stuff on it when I was a kid.

Thread beginning with comment 584218
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Comment by MOS6510
by wazoox on Mon 10th Mar 2014 11:25 UTC in reply to "Comment by MOS6510"
wazoox
Member since:
2005-07-14

Usually floppy disk drive fail by their rubber belt, which dries and break. I've opened several floppy drives and replaced the belts with ordinary rubber bands of roughly same length, and it just works.
Very old floppy disks work fine too. I have many floppies from 1987-1995 and they all work perfectly well; in fact the younger ones are much less reliable than the old ones.

Edited 2014-03-10 11:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510
by daedalus on Mon 10th Mar 2014 15:26 in reply to "RE: Comment by MOS6510"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

Which floppy drives had a rubber band driving them? Are you sure you don't mean tape drives? I don't know of any "modern" floppy drives with a belt drive, and would've thought the precise positioning needed would mean belts were a no-no... But I'd love to read about one if there was, some of that old tech is fascinating!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by tylerdurden on Mon 10th Mar 2014 19:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Most 5.25" drives had transmission belts, so did most early 3.5" drives as well. At least during the 80s.

The belt was used to generate the rotational speed of the disk platter by transmitting the rpms from the electric motor, the positioning of the head (where the accuracy is needed) is not done with a belt but rather a direct mechanical arm.

Reply Parent Score: 3