Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Mar 2014 13:54 UTC
Games

Two loosely related news items.

During presentations and hands-on demos at Crytek's GDC booth, attendees can see for the first time ever full native Linux support in the new CRYENGINE. The CRYENGINE all-in-one game engine is also updated with the innovative features used to recreate the stunning Roman Empire seen in Ryse - including the brand new Physically Based Shading render pipeline, which uses real-world physics simulation to create amazingly realistic lighting and materials in CRYENGINE games.

Second, Valve has released ToGL as open source, a Direct3D-to-OpenGL translation layer, which the company itself uses for Dota 2.

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RE[5]: Nice Work!
by Wootery on Wed 12th Mar 2014 00:16 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Nice Work!"
Wootery
Member since:
2013-11-22

With respect, no, I didn't really misunderstand. You were unclear.


Linux + Wine needs to support directx natively, and based on my own experience it's extremely hit or miss.


You conflated Wine and Linux.

However these *should* be first class citizens within Wine without dependance on proprietary MS software.


In what sense does Wine not already do as you are describing? It does support a respectable subset of Direct3D.

Looking at this Wikipedia article ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_%28software%29#Software_a... ) I see that nowadays, using Gallium3D, Linux itself can be said to actually support at least some subset of Direct3D natively. Impressive bit of work, that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Nice Work!
by Alfman on Wed 12th Mar 2014 04:09 in reply to "RE[5]: Nice Work!"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Wootery,

You conflated Wine and Linux.


I regret having caused the confusion and turning the thread into a train wreck ;) However I really did mean Linux PLUS Wine. Linux does not support DirectX without Wine, and Wine can not support DirectX without the 3d graphics driver code from Linux, hence the "Linux + Wine".

In what sense does Wine not already do as you are describing? It does support a respectable subset of Direct3D.


Parts of it are incomplete, unmaintained, and broken, which is the reason I was happy for this news.


Gallium3D, Linux itself can be said to actually support at least some subset of Direct3D natively. Impressive bit of work, that.


Cool, that's a recent development though, if it is merged in the next linux distro I install, I'll be sure to take a look!

http://article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.video.mesa3d.devel/60445

Edited 2014-03-12 04:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[7]: Nice Work!
by oiaohm on Wed 12th Mar 2014 05:08 in reply to "RE[6]: Nice Work!"
oiaohm Member since:
2009-05-30

Wootery,

"You conflated Wine and Linux.


I regret having caused the confusion and turning the thread into a train wreck ;) However I really did mean Linux PLUS Wine. Linux does not support DirectX without Wine, and Wine can not support DirectX without the 3d graphics driver code from Linux, hence the "Linux + Wine".
"
Please remember wine runs on BSD and OS X as well.

Also Linux can support so much direct x without wine. http://www.osnews.com/story/613/Direct_3D_8_0_Wrapper_for_OpenGL_Op...

Yes this is not the first time a Direct x to opengl wrapper has appeared.

"In what sense does Wine not already do as you are describing? It does support a respectable subset of Direct3D.


Parts of it are incomplete, unmaintained, and broken, which is the reason I was happy for this news.
"
History of the direct x 8 wrapper and the direct x 1-7 wrapper before us that wrappers have zero effect on wine development and historically very min effect on applications ported.

Reply Parent Score: 4