Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 20th Mar 2014 23:15 UTC
3D News, GL, DirectX

DirectX 12 introduces the next version of Direct3D, the graphics API at the heart of DirectX. Direct3D is one of the most critical pieces of a game or game engine, and we've redesigned it to be faster and more efficient than ever before. Direct3D 12 enables richer scenes, more objects, and full utilization of modern GPU hardware. And it isn’t just for high-end gaming PCs either - Direct3D 12 works across all the Microsoft devices you care about. From phones and tablets, to laptops and desktops, and, of course, Xbox One, Direct3D 12 is the API you've been waiting for.

It's great that DirectX works across "phones and tablets, to laptops and desktops, and, of course, Xbox One", but an important adjective is missing here: Windows. With Microsoft playing little to no role in smartphone and tablets, and the desktop/laptop market being on hold, how much of a plus is DirectX on phones and tablets, really? Doesn't Windows Phone's and Windows 8 Metro's reliance on it only make it harder for game developers and houses to port their iOS and Android games over?

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All hopes on OpenGL
by REM2000 on Fri 21st Mar 2014 08:49 UTC
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

DirectX is a good API for gaming and is really fast however i would prefer to see OpenGL take off more and eventually become the standard for graphics programming due to it's cross platform and open standard nature.

You create a game in DirectX and it's hard to break out of the Microsoft ecosystem.

Reply Score: 7

RE: All hopes on OpenGL
by Kochise on Fri 21st Mar 2014 09:02 in reply to "All hopes on OpenGL"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

DirectX copying Mantle ?

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL
by WereCatf on Fri 21st Mar 2014 09:13 in reply to "RE: All hopes on OpenGL"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Yes, both DirectX12 and the next OpenGL will have features resembling Mantle, like e.g. much lower-level access to actual GPU-hardware. Khronos Group and Microsoft both saw the benefit Mantle offers and just had to do something to keep themselves relevant.

Can they match Mantle's performance, though? Well, that remains to be seen. Neither DirectX or OpenGL was designed from the get-go for the same kind of stuff as Mantle, so there could still be some things hindering them from achieving the same kinds of results. I'm certain someone will soon perform heavy benchmarking.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: All hopes on OpenGL
by andrewclunn on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:02 in reply to "All hopes on OpenGL"
andrewclunn Member since:
2012-11-05

There are a few things that Microsoft really does well, and should be given credit for. DirectX is one of them. Pushing forward the graphics API isn't something to scoff at. OpenGL plays catch up trying to copy what DirectX pioneers. 3D gaming isn't big on tablets partially because a tablet's touch interface doesn't really work for 3D controls, and graphics card vender specific graphics APIs are far worse than DirectX from any freedom standpoint.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL
by moondevil on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:08 in reply to "RE: All hopes on OpenGL"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

This is one thing may FOSS guys preaching OpenGL always miss.

- Not all OpenGL versions (mobile, web, desktop, embedded) are compatible

- You end up writing multiple code paths for supporting multiple vendors/targets

- Except for PS3 with ES 1.0/Cg, consoles do not use OpenGL

- C APIs for handling resources are a pain.

- OpenGL lacks standard way to load textures/fonts/contexts/shaders making each developer re-invent the wheel, or hunt for libraries.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL
by WereCatf on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:34 in reply to "RE: All hopes on OpenGL"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

OpenGL has nothing to do with touch-input. OpenGL only handles graphics output, it does not handle input devices at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3