Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 29th Apr 2014 15:04 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones

Firefox 29 has been released, and the most prominent new feature is an entirely new user interface. It's smoother and less angular, and has clearly been designed to somewhat resemble Google Chrome. Hence, I personally think it's a major step forward - except for Firefox' version of the Chrome menu, which uses a grid of icons instead of a list (?!) - but I'm nearly 100% convinced many Firefox users will not like it. It's change, after all.

Luckily, Firefox is customisable to the point of insanity, so I'm pretty sure you can revert to the old look with the right themes and extensions.

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RE: Freaking "UX designers"
by acobar on Wed 30th Apr 2014 14:58 UTC in reply to "Freaking "UX designers""
acobar
Member since:
2005-11-15

- All of those icons are hard to recognize and ugly as sin in the name of flat design fad. Why oh why do we have to have icons that look like they were designed for monochrome CGA displays. Please UX designers, let users at least have some colors to assassinate with those uniformly boring hieroglyphs.


I call this the easy-lazy-selfish design path. Easy, because it is generally straightforward to get things sharing "consistent look" when you "glyph-ify" them. Lazy because it is the path of less resistance, as it takes lots of hours get the things smooth if you have variabilities on shapes and colors. It is also well known that designers love to control all aspects of the interface they are working on, they also do not have infinity time and, as so, we have the current situation.

Truth be told, it is also a reaction against the "over exaggeration" (sorry for the pleonasm) we had before on interface elements on toolbars, arrows with all shapes and dimensional aspects and so on and so forth.

Shapes and colors are helpful when you need to spot a functionality for quick access but if you use too much of them things can speedily get awkward (from a design POV).

I hope a middle term will be achieved soon, like we almost had on OS-X of past (don't know the current situation as I don't use macs anymore and have contact with old systems only).

Edited 2014-04-30 15:00 UTC

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