Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 1st May 2014 16:45 UTC
Internet Explorer

Despite XP's end of support, Microsoft is still going to release the fix for the recent Internet Explorer vulnerability for the ageing operating system.

Even though Windows XP is no longer supported by Microsoft and is past the time we normally provide security updates, we've decided to provide an update for all versions of Windows XP (including embedded), today. We made this exception based on the proximity to the end of support for Windows XP. The reality is there have been a very small number of attacks based on this particular vulnerability and concerns were, frankly, overblown. Unfortunately this is a sign of the times and this is not to say we don’t take these reports seriously. We absolutely do.

If you're still on Windows XP, you deserve to be insecure. Get a modern operating system - Windows 7/8, OS X, Linux, anything. XP is outdated crap, and it's time to move on.

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Comment by kurkosdr
by kurkosdr on Thu 1st May 2014 17:48 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

If you're still on Windows XP, you deserve to be insecure. Get a modern operating system - Windows 7/8, OS X, Linux, anything. XP is outdated crap, and it's time to move on.

I don't think anyone who is reading a site called "OSNews" is still on XP. Hence, I don't think this (otherwise useful) advice will actually reach the ears of any XP users (at least not directly).

I have no idea why so many still use IE6, other than that I hear some online banking sites in China still require it.

Early Windows XP cracks "required" Windows Update to be disabled (because of WGA). So, those people are probably running cracked versions of XP with Update disabled, and don't know enough about computers to care about installing another browser.

In fact, they may not even know what Windows Update is, if they bought a computer with cracked XP preinstalled (happens if you buy from shady computer shops assembling PCs on site) or if they had some friend install cracked XP for them, and Windows Update was disabled for them by someone else.

Then there are people with slow connections who disabled Windows Update because it was annoying them, and also don't care about installing another browser.

IE6 needs to be blacklisted by websites, plain and simple, while directing users to more modern browsers.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Comment by kurkosdr
by bosco_bearbank on Thu 1st May 2014 21:18 in reply to "Comment by kurkosdr"
bosco_bearbank Member since:
2005-10-12

I don't think anyone who is reading a site called "OSNews" is still on XP.

My now-ancient netbook came with XP and still has XP installed. 99.9% of the time, however, it runs Fedora or Ubuntu. Of the 0.1% of the time I need to run XP, if I need to use a browser, it's Firefox.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by kurkosdr
by KLU9 on Fri 2nd May 2014 10:41 in reply to "Comment by kurkosdr"
KLU9 Member since:
2006-12-06

It's been so long since I... um... "experimented with an unauthorized copy of XP for purely academic purposes" (phew, I think got away with that).. that I had forgotten about early pirate copies not being able to update.

Edit:
And they can't just "update" to a free OS like Linux unless they want to cut themselves off from the rest of society.

Because *everyone* in China is on QQ (IM) and QQ is just an incredible pain in the arse to try and get running on anything (anything desktop) but Windows. I know, I've tried.
(And yes, I know about the handrolled debs kicking around for Ubuntu. I even tried the GenyMotion emulator + apk for QQ for Android.)

Edited 2014-05-02 10:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by kurkosdr
by r_a_trip on Fri 2nd May 2014 13:58 in reply to "RE: Comment by kurkosdr"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Even in that case, I would lock XP up in a virtual machine to run QQ and do the rest of my computing on Linux. (Then again, I am of the firm belief that any version of Windows should be locked up in a VM and only used when absolutely necessary.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by kurkosdr
by daedalus on Fri 2nd May 2014 11:11 in reply to "Comment by kurkosdr"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

I don't think anyone who is reading a site called "OSNews" is still on XP. Hence, I don't think this (otherwise useful) advice will actually reach the ears of any XP users (at least not directly).


I'm still using XP, since it's working fine for me and I don't see the point in shelling out money for a newer version, especially since I use a Linux machine for browsing.

Maybe I'm the odd one out here, but I see Windows as nothing more than a boring tool to enable me to run certain applications. It's other OSes that interest me, and therefore I'm not bothered paying money for what in my usage case is little more than eye candy. In a similar way to how I haven't updated from Office 2003 and Photoshop CS3 - they both do everything I want so why pay money for no benefits?

Of course others will see benefits or have an interest in such software and so will want to update to be able to use these shiny new features, and more power to them. I just don't see it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by kurkosdr
by acobar on Fri 2nd May 2014 14:44 in reply to "RE: Comment by kurkosdr"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Me too. I still have a partition with Windows XP with Windows embedded build tools to support small shops I work with. Never ever had any viruses or even spyware on this machine. The main problems with XP, besides its security architecture being broke by design, is that almost all people run with administrator privilege because lots of software just could not work on regular accounts. This and the fact that Internet Explorer was so interweave with system files that a compromise on it could rapidly be escalated to affect the whole system.

The advices I give to people that want to stay on XP, and most of them are old guys and old ladies is:
- run on regular accounts;
- do not use Internet Explorer to anything but trusted services that can not run on anything else;
- on FIrefox or Chrome, install ad and script blocks;
- put a good anti-virus on your machine with integrated anti-spyware, fishing detection and network monitoring;
- have a second static anti-malware scanner and use it from time to time;
- have backups because all computers "die", the old ones usually first, just like us.

Reply Parent Score: 5