Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 9th May 2014 18:36 UTC
Legal

A San Francisco federal judge had decided that Oracle could not claim copyright protection on parts of Java, but on Friday the three-judge Federal Circuit panel reversed that ruling.

"We conclude that a set of commands to instruct a computer to carry out desired operations may contain expression that is eligible for copyright protection," Federal Circuit Judge Kathleen O'Malley wrote.

This is terrible news for the technology industry and us enthusiasts.

This case should have ended with this. Everything after that is a sham.

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RE: Comment by Nelson
by satan666 on Fri 9th May 2014 20:56 UTC in reply to "Comment by Nelson"
satan666
Member since:
2008-04-18

Florian was, is and will forever be wrong because he is a piece of paid by Oracle sh!t.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by Nelson
by Nelson on Fri 9th May 2014 21:03 in reply to "RE: Comment by Nelson"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Florian was, is and will forever be wrong because he is a piece of paid by Oracle sh!t.


He called this ruling in December. Lol. I don't see how him doing consulting for Oracle makes a difference.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Nelson
by galvanash on Sat 10th May 2014 08:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Nelson"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

He called this ruling in December. Lol. I don't see how him doing consulting for Oracle makes a difference.


Because he is a self proclaimed pundit. He is supposed to be using his subject matter expertise to publish opinion for the benefit of the public. He has done quite a bit of that over the years and done it well.

However, when you offer opinion on the outcome of a legal case involving someone who pays you its stops being punditry and becomes cheer leading.

He's is no longer a pundit on matters involving Oracle, he is a shill. Not in a derogatory sense - in a literal sense. His opinion on the matter is worth exactly nothing to anyone by his employer.

It really doesn't matter if he is right or wrong. He should have recused himself and not spoken openly about it. Assuming he cared about keeping his reputation intact, that was the only honorable thing he could do in his situation.

Reply Parent Score: 7