Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 16th May 2014 17:02 UTC
General Development

The hardest thing about learning a new programming language is that there are usually at least one or two novel features that break the mold of our current mental framework. If not, the language may not be worth learning in the first place.

So, given that learning new languages can be challenging, I would like to share a tip that has served me well over the years.

One of the best ways to really understand a new or novel language feature is to think of ways to twist and abuse it.

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RE: Finally...
by some1 on Fri 16th May 2014 18:52 UTC in reply to "Finally..."
some1
Member since:
2010-10-05

Scheme is not in any way a successor of Common Lisp. It's closer to the opposite.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Finally...
by Kochise on Fri 16th May 2014 19:29 in reply to "RE: Finally..."
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

True indeed :

http://www.levenez.com/lang/

Lisp 1958 -> Scheme 1975 (merged with Algol) -> Common Lisp 1984 -> Clos 1989

Another source :

http://oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/news/languageposter_0504.html

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Finally...
by Kochise on Fri 16th May 2014 22:36 in reply to "RE[2]: Finally..."
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Lisp in Python :

http://norvig.com/lispy.html

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2