Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd May 2014 18:21 UTC, submitted by Shane
General Development

I was at the OpenStack Summit this week. The overwhelming majority of OpenStack deployments are Linux-based, yet the most popular laptop vendor (by a long way) at the conference was Apple. People are writing code with the intention of deploying it on Linux, but they're doing so under an entirely different OS.

But what's really interesting is the tools they're using to do so. When I looked over people's shoulders, I saw terminals and a web browser. They're not using Macs because their development tools require them, they're using Macs because of what else they get - an aesthetically pleasing OS, iTunes and what's easily the best trackpad hardware/driver combination on the market. These are people who work on the same laptop that they use at home. They'll use it when they're commuting, either for playing videos or for getting a head start so they can leave early. They use an Apple because they don't want to use different hardware for work and pleasure.

Apple's laptops are still the best PCs money can buy at the moment (despite their horribly outdated displays). It's no wonder Linux developers, too, favour them.

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Comment by vivainio
by vivainio on Thu 22nd May 2014 18:42 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

At work, I use a MBP now.

It's a good 'middle ground' in that it runs MS software (office, lync), VPN works, but you still get most of the tools and terminal convenience as with Linux.

When I need Linux, I either ssh to a computer or use Vagrant (e.g when developing a web app on my mac).

Also, that touchpad is best ever. Really. Try it for 15 minutes.

(I'm not an Apple fanboy by any means, e.g. I steer clear of iOS devices)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by vivainio
by wojtek on Thu 22nd May 2014 19:09 in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
wojtek Member since:
2010-01-24

s a good 'middle ground' in that it runs MS software (office, lync), VPN works, but you still get most of the tools and terminal convenience as with Linux.


This!
I was MS guy (for me windows 'just works') with linux on remote/vm locally for work/tinkering but the experience was sub-pair. I got Mac for work last year - and slowly I found myself that I used old laptop less and less; on mac I could easily dive to work (you gotta love the hassle-less shell without cygwin or somesuch) and the UI that just works (like in windows; sadly my experience with linux was never ever that smooth).

And also - yes, the touchpad is amazing... saddly...

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Comment by vivainio
by le_c on Thu 22nd May 2014 22:19 in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
le_c Member since:
2013-01-02

not as good as a track point though ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Plus a thousand points to you, sir.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by vivainio
by zima on Tue 27th May 2014 18:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by vivainio"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually, research suggests that touchpads are better than trackpoints: see second part of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pointing_stick#Ergonomics

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by vivainio
by Vanders on Thu 22nd May 2014 22:36 in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

At work, I use a MBP now.

Exactly the same deal here. Everything I write is destined to run on Linux, but I have an R&D lab and Vagrant for that.

I wouldn't pay for it myself but if my employer wants to pay the premium then I'm fine with that: I get a decent laptop with excellent battery life that does what I need. (Actually my one complaint hardware wise is that it only has two Thunderbolt ports and no Ethernet port)

I don't buy the idea that OS X is some sort of Gods Gift to operating systems. It annoys the piss out me plenty of times each and every day, frankly.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by vivainio
by Alfman on Fri 23rd May 2014 00:26 in reply to "RE: Comment by vivainio"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Vanders,

I wouldn't pay for it myself but if my employer wants to pay the premium then I'm fine with that: I get a decent laptop with excellent battery life that does what I need. (Actually my one complaint hardware wise is that it only has two Thunderbolt ports and no Ethernet port)


I wouldn't turn one down either, but I agree the price tag is hard to justify personally. Also, a "pro" laptop should have an ethernet port since I still frequently need it!


I don't buy the idea that OS X is some sort of Gods Gift to operating systems. It annoys the piss out me plenty of times each and every day, frankly.


I didn't think of that, but you are right. I find it ironic that the fanboys themselves create a kind of stigma around the platform (not everyone mind you, but a disproportionate about compared to other platforms). I'd use an apple laptop to get work done, but I'd want nothing to do with the smugness that these apple users so often exhibit. If I had a macbook, I might deface it to 'be different' and make a statement; I wonder if this would void the warranty?

Edited 2014-05-23 00:28 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by vivainio
by TemporalBeing on Fri 23rd May 2014 18:18 in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

At work, I use a MBP now.


Same here, MBP Retina.

It's a good 'middle ground' in that it runs MS software (office, lync), VPN works, but you still get most of the tools and terminal convenience as with Linux.


Ehh...not quite. If you install homebrew stuff you can get most of the way there. Still, nothing like the Linux Desktop environments; and only works if you can get use to the various Mac-specific keyboard shortcuts.

After 6 weeks, it drove me nuts and I reformatted the system over to Linux so now it's Kubuntu 14.04.

That said, there's some things that don't quite work right with it - namely disconnecting the Thunberbolt/Lightening Ethernet and sleep mode.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by vivainio
by Vanders on Fri 23rd May 2014 18:24 in reply to "RE: Comment by vivainio"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

only works if you can get use to the various Mac-specific keyboard shortcuts.


Oh God, talk about a space cadet keyboard. My battle against RSI and trying to remember which particular combination of Fn/Ctrl/Cmd I need at any given moment continues, and the Mac is winning.

Don't even talk to me about Apples bizarre idea of what a GB-UK keyboard is.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Comment by vivainio
by Jaxxed on Mon 26th May 2014 10:26 in reply to "Comment by vivainio"
Jaxxed Member since:
2010-05-29

as someone who develops more webapps than anything else, the vagrant route was my solution when on a mac or win machine, but the performance gets horrible (VBox in particular.)

When developing natively on linux (most of my servers are linux) then tools such as lxc and docker make all of those problems go away.
Vagrant-lxc and vagrant-docker aren't in the greatest shape, but once tweaked they work well.

Honestly though, that it takes some 10 seconds to get a new vm up and running is a big pro.

Reply Parent Score: 1