Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 7th Jun 2014 00:53 UTC
Xfce Over the past several years, mobile devices have greatly influenced user interfaces. That's great for handheld users but leaves those of us who rely on laptops and desktops in the lurch. Windows 8, Ubuntu Unity, and GNOME have all radically changed in ways that leave personal computer users scratching their heads.

One user interface completely avoided this controversy: Xfce. This review takes a quick look at Xfce today. Who is this product for? Who should pass it by?
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WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

I find it really annoying how a lot of people use the word "traditional" to refer to the Windows95 user interface.


When I think of 'traditional' desktops, I think of a desktop background that you can put icons on, some sort of taskbar/dock, a recycle bin, etc. I'm not sure if Win95 was the first to put all of these elements together, but I think it was the first widespread 'mainstream' desktop environment that most can identify with. So, I think referring to it as the defacto 'traditional' desktop is pretty accurate, since most of us have been using it for nearly 20 years.

Reply Parent Score: 10

puenktchen Member since:
2007-07-27

"I find it really annoying how a lot of people use the word "traditional" to refer to the Windows95 user interface.


When I think of 'traditional' desktops, I think of a desktop background that you can put icons on ..
"

Yes - and without a "Start Menu" - like LisaOS, MacOS, GEM, TOS, AmigaOS, Nextstep, RiscOS, Windows before 95, OS2 - everyone who used a GUI before 1995 still knows how a traditional GUI looked like for more than ten years before MS screwed it up.


On Topic: I still always liked Xfce

Edited 2014-06-07 10:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4