Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jun 2014 22:17 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes

This site calls itself 'the biggest free abandonware downloads collection in the universe'. No idea if that's true or not, but all I can say is that I spent a lot - a lot - of time today browsing through the incredibly extensive collection of old operating systems. From an alpha release of Windows 1.0 to NEXTSTEP, this site has it all.

Great for emulators.

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RE: 98Lite!
by whartung on Sat 7th Jun 2014 16:30 UTC in reply to "98Lite!"
whartung
Member since:
2005-07-06


Although I have to say while I may wax nostalgic about stripping OSes for speed I don't think I'd like to go back, having 6 cores and oodles of RAM is just too nice. Its just amazing to see how far we have come, when my $100 GPU card has more memory and processor speed than my first 7 computers put together!


At the same time, I marvel sort of in disgust when we used to be able to run NeXTSTEP on a 25MHz machine with 20MB of RAM and a 200MB disk, and yet we find it difficult to squeeze an OS on to a 700MHz Raspberry Pi w/128MB of RAM.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: 98Lite!
by agentj on Sat 7th Jun 2014 17:29 in reply to "RE: 98Lite!"
agentj Member since:
2005-08-19

Yeah, right. Of course NeXTStep and old 25MHz hardware could handle complex 3D rendering, multiple CPU cores, gigabytes of memory, hundreds of system services and thousands of threads running at the same time, multiple 4K displays, terabytes of data, real time high resolution multimedia processing, user interfaces even with icons more detailed than resolution of old machine, etc.

Edited 2014-06-07 17:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: 98Lite!
by Morgan on Sat 7th Jun 2014 23:42 in reply to "RE[2]: 98Lite!"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Yeah, right. Of course NeXTStep and old 25MHz hardware could handle complex 3D rendering


For their time, yes they could. John Carmack wrote Doom and Wolfenstein 3D on a NeXT Cube, and they were by far the most advanced games of their time.


multiple CPU cores, gigabytes of memory, hundreds of system services and thousands of threads running at the same time, multiple 4K displays, terabytes of data...


Wait, you're seriously faulting an OS made in the early 90s for not being able to handle tech that has only been around for the past 10 years or so? What are you smoking?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: 98Lite!
by Soulbender on Sun 8th Jun 2014 05:59 in reply to "RE: 98Lite!"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Pffffftt.
Back in my day.....
PC's had 4MB of RAM and maybe a whopping 40MB of hard disk. That was good enough for Wing Commander (after you've spent a day freeing up low memory).
Much better days, I think we can all agree. Am I right?

Edited 2014-06-08 05:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: 98Lite!
by cpuobsessed on Sun 8th Jun 2014 15:58 in reply to "RE[2]: 98Lite!"
cpuobsessed Member since:
2009-06-09

You were lucky! I had a 1 Mb 8Mhz no hard drive; finally got the money to get an external 20Mb HD, was able to upgrade that to 60Mb. I miss the days of assembly language on a Motorola 68k.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: 98Lite!
by bassbeast on Mon 9th Jun 2014 05:19 in reply to "RE[2]: 98Lite!"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

You were lucky friend, I was stuck on Commodore Cassette drives for the better part of the 80s. Do you have ANY idea how fricking SLOW and unreliable those things were?

The others can talk about how much better things were "back in the day" but give me my hexacore with 3TB of space, 8GB of RAM with another GB on the GPU, thanks ever so.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: 98Lite!
by shotsman on Mon 9th Jun 2014 15:33 in reply to "RE[2]: 98Lite!"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Before the PC

A 1Mhz(max)/1Mb RAM single core machine could support 64 or even 128 users logged in with dumb terminals doing real work, nit posting inanities to Twitter etc

Progress, what progress?

RSTS/E if you were interested running on a DEC PDP-11/70.

Reply Parent Score: 3