Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Jun 2014 14:03 UTC
Mac OS X

HFS+ lost a total of 28 files over the course of 6 years.

Most of the corrupted files are completely unreadable. The JPEGs typically decode partially, up to the point of failure. So if you're lucky, you may get most of the image except the bottom part. The raw .CR2 files usually turn out to be totally unreadable: either completely black or having a large color overlay on significant portions of the photo. Most of these shots are not so important, but a handful of them are. One of the CR2 files in particular, is a very good picture of my son when he was a baby. I printed and framed that photo, so I am glad that I did not lose the original.

If you're keeping all your files and backups on HFS+ volumes, you're doing it wrong.

HFS+ is a weird vestigial pre-OS X leftover that, for some reason, Apple just does not replace. Apple tends to be relentless when it comes to moving on from past code, but HFS+ just refuses to die. As John Siracusa, long-time critic of HFS+, stated way back in 2011:

I would have certainly welcomed ZFS with open arms, but I was equally confident that Apple could create its own file system suited to its particular needs. That confidence remains, but the ZFS distraction may have added years to the timetable.

Three years later, and still nothing, and with Yosemite also shipping with HFS+, it'll take another 1-2 years before we possibly see a new, modern, non-crappy filesystem for OS X. Decades from now, books will be written about this saga.

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someone
Member since:
2006-01-12

But you do get "bit rot" in stone slabs and vellum (another good reason to store as much data as possible in plain text formats, which is not possible in the case of photos)

Edited 2014-06-12 01:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

someone,

But you do get "bit rot" in stone slabs and vellum (another good reason to store as much data as possible in plain text formats, which is not possible in the case of photos)



In rome, I was amazed to see how the monuments appeared to have "melted" due to the effects of rain over roughly two thousand years:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colosseum#mediaviewer/File:Rome_%2...

Also the Roman Forum is littered with stone monuments that have cracked apart and fallen to the ground. The remaining pieces are amazing, yet it's clear that only fragments of the original structures managed to survive:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Forum#mediaviewer/File:Roman_for...

Many stone monuments undergo preservation efforts to ensure they don't break apart further, even relatively new stone structures are already cracking:
http://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/24/us/a-face-lift-for-mount-rushmore...


So, while some stone remnants might last thousands of years, most will not survive, at least not without some kind of sheltered environment. For what it's worth, the scientists at NASA decided to use golden disks containing both audio and data to leave a mark of humanity in outer space for the ages:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_Golden_Record

The KEO project, a time capsule of humanity is also relevant here, uses specially made DVDs:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KEO

This is more interesting than HFS+, right? ;)

Edited 2014-06-12 03:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

rhavenn Member since:
2006-05-12


In rome, I was amazed to see how the monuments appeared to have "melted" due to the effects of rain over roughly two thousand years:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colosseum#mediaviewer/File:Rome_%2...



Most of this "melt" is from the last 100 years or so due to acid rain and general industrial pollution (smog, etc..). Sure, clean rain water will eat away, but it takes a lot longer then 2 or 3 thousand years for any "hard" rock like marble or granite.

Edited 2014-06-13 05:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

another good reason to store as much data as possible in plain text formats, which is not possible in the case of photos)

But there are text-based image formats! ;)

Install IrfanView and open any photo with it. Now choose "Save as..." and pick PBM/PGM/PPM and in the options of saving those formats choose "Ascii encoding"

Now open the resulting file in a text editor. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2