Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 8th Jul 2014 21:23 UTC, submitted by Ari
Red Hat

The CentOS Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of CentOS 7 for x86_64, including images for docker, and various cloud providers. There are many fundamental changes in this release, compared to previous releases of CentOS. Notably the inclusion of systemd, Gnome3, and a default filesystem of XFS. For more information about what makes CentOS 7 stand out, please see our release notes.

CentOS 6 can be upgraded to 7, but that functionality is still being tested.

Thread beginning with comment 592022
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
desktop?
by project_2501 on Tue 8th Jul 2014 22:45 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

Is centos7 a good choice for a desktop?

I suppose these days yo no longer need cutting edge distros to ensure basic things like wifi and video replay works?

Reply Score: 2

RE: desktop?
by evert on Tue 8th Jul 2014 22:56 in reply to "desktop?"
evert Member since:
2005-07-06

That is true, and if you have just basic needs and want stability, than yes.

But soon you might find yourself in the situation that you will add custom repositories because you just want some application or newer version or feature...

So yes, if you are sure about your future needs, and if you need stability, go for it. Otherwise, Arch / Mint / Ubuntu / Fedora / Mageia are just better choices.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: desktop?
by shotsman on Wed 9th Jul 2014 05:55 in reply to "RE: desktop?"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Ubuntu, Fedora etc are better than CentOS?
Really?
Ubuntu seems to change according to the whims of Canonical. Mint wouldn't be where it is today if it wasn't.
Fedora, and I am a fan of the distro is not for the timid or newbie. It is unashamedly a bleeding edge distro. As such it is sometimes very fragile.

CentOS is my distro of choice these days. Stable and does the job I want it to. Yes, I use it on the desktop as well as servers and in VM's. Sure the new Anaconda can throw a few people but honestly, how much of the life of a linux system is 'Installation'?
(Unless you are a Journalist that is...)

Also, you get the updates that RH make to RHEL 5,6 and now 7. 10 years of updates should be enough for anyone in most circumstances.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: desktop?
by tidux on Tue 8th Jul 2014 23:22 in reply to "desktop?"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Try Fedora 19 in live mode. It's what CentOS 7 was based on. The good news is that if you need proprietary GPU drivers, latest Enterprise Linux is always supported by nvidia and fglrx.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: desktop?
by richarson on Thu 10th Jul 2014 00:24 in reply to "RE: desktop?"
richarson Member since:
2014-05-24

There's also Gnome and KDE live versions of CentOS 7 to try out, no need to use Fedora 19 for that.

And the installer is not so bad, though I prefer the one on CentOs 6.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: desktop?
by Soulbender on Wed 9th Jul 2014 06:05 in reply to "desktop?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Depends. Do you value "stability" over having software that was released less than 5 years ago?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: desktop?
by richarson on Thu 10th Jul 2014 00:28 in reply to "RE: desktop?"
richarson Member since:
2014-05-24

To be fair, some desktop software is actually kept up to date, like Firefox, LibreOffice, flash.

And then there is the Software Collections and Developer Toolset with paralell installable versions of server and development packages (mysql/mariadb, perl, python, ruby, gcc).

But yeah, if you want a current desktop you should consider other distros.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: desktop?
by acobar on Wed 9th Jul 2014 15:43 in reply to "desktop?"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Well, CentOS is awesome for servers but I would not use it for desktop unless your workplace has a demand for conformity/uniformity software deployment. Unless something changed lately (I confess I had not used it for Desktop deployment on 4+ years), the obsolescence of some packages may become a problem.

To be fair, if you plan to use it on scientific activities, EPEL (https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL) provides you packages reasonably up-to-date. The only problems I had were mainly related to packages that would require more recent versions of what were on the core OS base/system set and this is quite uncommon for scientific packages. I ended moving from it because I wanted updated versions for development tools (compiler, IDE, etc).

One note about the previous paragraph: I explained the main problems I had, but there is one another even less common, packages that may need to be compiled against other libs whose licenses are "non-conforming" to expose some desired features you may want/need are, sometimes hard to "upgrade" because of dependence chains. Don't know if it is still true, though (again, to be fair, it may be a problem for other distros too).

Anyway, For desktops I prefer very much openSUSE plus some extras repos from "http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/" to keep packages classes you may need more up-to-date. Also, the community has extras packages on build.opensuse.org and you may even use OBS to compile your own packages set.

Edited 2014-07-09 15:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: desktop?
by Finalzone on Wed 9th Jul 2014 18:59 in reply to "RE: desktop?"
Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

Anyway, For desktops I prefer very much openSUSE plus some extras repos from "http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/" to keep packages classes you may need more up-to-date. Also, the community has extras packages on build.opensuse.org and you may even use OBS to compile your own packages set.

COPR (Cool Other Package Repository) "http://copr.fedoraproject.org/" is the equivalent of Suse OBS.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: desktop?
by SeeM on Wed 9th Jul 2014 18:43 in reply to "desktop?"
SeeM Member since:
2011-09-10

Is centos7 a good choice for a desktop?

I suppose these days yo no longer need cutting edge distros to ensure basic things like wifi and video replay works?


Sooner or later Chrome, Steam, or xyz will just say no without new libs.

And prepare for rebuilding tons of packages from Fedora 19/20 in near future. It doesn't hurt, but takes a lot of time and you end with gazillion devels installed. Unless you will rebuild them on virtual machine and create your own yum repo there.

Also choose hardware very carefully, you will see new drivers rather sporadically.

Want more? ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: desktop?
by richarson on Thu 10th Jul 2014 00:37 in reply to "RE: desktop?"
richarson Member since:
2014-05-24

"Is centos7 a good choice for a desktop?

I suppose these days yo no longer need cutting edge distros to ensure basic things like wifi and video replay works?


Sooner or later Chrome, Steam, or xyz will just say no without new libs.
"

True, it already happend with CentOS 6 AFAIK, and with Ubuntu 10.04.

And prepare for rebuilding tons of packages from Fedora 19/20 in near future. It doesn't hurt, but takes a lot of time and you end with gazillion devels installed. Unless you will rebuild them on virtual machine and create your own yum repo there.


Why would you? Unless you can't find those packages in EPEL (https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL) or some other 3rd party repo I don't see the need to recompile software from Fedora (which is basically what EPEL does).

Also choose hardware very carefully, you will see new drivers rather sporadically.

Want more? ;)


New drivers go in roughly every 6 months with the point releases, for the first few years. After that it's just bug fixes mostly.

Reply Parent Score: 2