Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 12th Jul 2014 00:44 UTC
Legal

If you think only Apple, Google, Intel, and several other technology companies flagrantly broke the law by illegally robbing their employees of wages - think again. As it turns out, the digital animation industry - centering around Steve Jobs' Pixar, unsurprisingly - was just as bad.

[Pixar's] Catmull's deposition and emails from the lawsuit confirm that he was instrumental in operating a secret wage-theft cartel that violated the Sherman Antitrust Act. But it's even worse than you think. The cartel orchestrated in large part by Catmull robbed potential wages and job opportunities from thousands of animation industry workers at other studios, including DreamWorks, Lucasfilm, Robert Zemeckis’ ImageMovers, the now-defunct Orphanage, and Walt Disney Animation Studios.

Pando Daily has the meat on this story (here and here).

The wage fixing scandal is way, way more sprawling than anyone could have originally anticipated. The sad thing is that the criminals behind this illegal behaviour - Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, Eric Schmidt, George Lucas, Ed Catmull, and many, many more - will never have to face any serious consequences for their crimes.

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double standards
by project_2501 on Sat 12th Jul 2014 13:24 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

Reminds new of the all to common news here in the UK.

If a single parent mother struggling to fwd her children is caught stealing a chocolate bar she is brutality thrown in a police car, paraded in front of cameras, serves jail time and has her children taken into care. For stealing a chocolate bar worth 60 pence. Or 50 cents.

If an executive steals money by fixing salaries, manipulating financial instruments or obfuscating tax to the the of millions of pounds/dollars... He is slapped on the wrist.

Both are crimes.
But something is at play here where one kind is somehow less bad?

In the UK we had yet more politicians' expenses scandals. To the tune of thousands per person. Yet no jail time. No rough handling in cuffs on camera?

Reply Score: 3

RE: double standards
by Vanders on Sat 12th Jul 2014 15:58 in reply to "double standards"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Reminds new of the all to common news here in the UK.

If a single parent mother struggling to fwd her children is caught stealing a chocolate bar she is brutality thrown in a police car, paraded in front of cameras, serves jail time and has her children taken into care.


What? When did this happen?

In the UK we had yet more politicians' expenses scandals. To the tune of thousands per person. Yet no jail time.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/8776160/Exp...

Four MPs and two members of the House of Lords have so far been jailed as a result of the expenses scandal.


A quick look shows an average sentence of around 14 months.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: double standards
by quackalist on Sun 13th Jul 2014 02:07 in reply to "double standards"
quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

A couple or so politicians did do jail time. Not a lot, time or politicians. Certainly not enough of either. The sense of entitlement they and others of like ilk have is frightening.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: double standards
by cpiral on Mon 14th Jul 2014 00:09 in reply to "double standards"
cpiral Member since:
2006-04-19

But something is at play here where one kind is somehow less bad?


The play is on the legislative and judicial stages.

One sentiment in your scenario is affected by a global, impersonal force most interested in the long-term development of infrastructure by corporate means, the other from a personal force interested in the short-term maintenance of ethics on the backs of persons. The question contains a category error.

Reply Parent Score: 1