Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Jul 2014 13:57 UTC
Games

A while ago, we've announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It's not about them, after all, it's about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com!

Good on 'm.

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RE[2]: I want to apologise
by Kivada on Thu 24th Jul 2014 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE: I want to apologise"
Kivada
Member since:
2010-07-07

They'd have a hell of allot harder time installing it. The only way to is to social engineer your way into getting the user to download the package then put in their root password to install the package.

It's doable, but much more work then what amounts to drive by attacks on Windows.

So no, I don't buy that if the roles where reversed that Linux would have as high an infection rate, Open Source systems run the fattest and most profitable targets on earth, including the vast majority of internet facing servers, all the code is out there to be read and exploits to be found and used, yet there isn't a constant stream of malware to get rich quick here.

if security through obscurity worked then there wouldn't be a constant news of new holes found in Microsoft products. There was so much bad PR about the number of security patches Microsoft had to put out that they condensed them into once a week patches instead daily security patches just for the first party Microsoft software.

By comparison, in Linux it's very rare that theres a security patch issued for a core piece of the OS, random internet facing software, sure, theres patches 2-3 times a week, but they are small, 10Mb at the most for a large number of updates, often including non security related updates for the other 4000+ packages I have installed, I click install and never miss a beat, work isn't interrupted, restarts not needed, everything just keeps right on going, now with patched security.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I want to apologise
by WorknMan on Fri 25th Jul 2014 00:32 in reply to "RE[2]: I want to apologise"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

So no, I don't buy that if the roles where reversed that Linux would have as high an infection rate, Open Source systems run the fattest and most profitable targets on earth, including the vast majority of internet facing servers, all the code is out there to be read and exploits to be found and used, yet there isn't a constant stream of malware to get rich quick here.


Right, because servers run by competent admins are the same as desktops run by nimrods who will click on anything that promises them nude pics of Megan Fox. Come on, man... surely you're not that dumb? All the security in the world doesn't amount to shit when users simply click past the security prompts in order to install that emoji pack they were just offered by some random website. Besides, I see articles about server/website security breaches all the time, so they're obviously not THAT bulletproof.

Windows these days isn't perfect, but pretty solid; if that weren't the case, then my Windows box would've been compromised by some drive-by malware a long time ago. Hell, I don't even run any 3rd party firewalls. It's the shitty apps like Flash and Java that have more holes than swiss cheese.

Edited 2014-07-25 00:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: I want to apologise
by Kivada on Fri 25th Jul 2014 00:46 in reply to "RE[3]: I want to apologise"
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

How many of those competent admins still haven't fixed their SSL?

Just because it's a server running Linux doesn't mean the admin knows what they're doing and even if they do, the authority to patch the server may be out of their hands.

Edited 2014-07-25 00:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I want to apologise
by WereCatf on Fri 25th Jul 2014 05:48 in reply to "RE[2]: I want to apologise"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

They'd have a hell of allot harder time installing it. The only way to is to social engineer your way into getting the user to download the package then put in their root password to install the package.


There are privilege escalation bugs even on Linux, just the same as there are on Windows. Do a Google - search with "linux privilege escalation" and set the timeframe to search in to one month and you'll still see fresh bugs here and there. If Ubuntu was the top dog instead of Windows you'd most likely see the number of these bugs at least triple.

That is to say that driveby-attacks would certainly be possible under Linux, too.

I click install and never miss a beat, work isn't interrupted, restarts not needed, everything just keeps right on going, now with patched security.


I'm going to have to point out that you're not, actually, running with "patched security" unless you restart the services and applications affected, only restarted and/or new fired-up software is, so unless you manually restarted everything that was patched you're still better off rebooting.

Edited 2014-07-25 05:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: I want to apologise
by present_arms on Fri 25th Jul 2014 11:27 in reply to "RE[3]: I want to apologise"
present_arms Member since:
2005-07-09

I click install and never miss a beat, work isn't interrupted, restarts not needed, everything just keeps right on going, now with patched security.


I'm going to have to point out that you're not, actually, running with "patched security" unless you restart the services and applications affected, only restarted and/or new fired-up software is, so unless you manually restarted everything that was patched you're still better off rebooting. [/q]

All distros will restart the service after an update of the service that has been updated. It's rare you have to reboot, mainly after a kernel update and in some cases you can boot the replaced kernel without rebooting using kexec.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: I want to apologise
by richarson on Sat 26th Jul 2014 03:36 in reply to "RE[3]: I want to apologise"
richarson Member since:
2014-05-24

"They'd have a hell of allot harder time installing it. The only way to is to social engineer your way into getting the user to download the package then put in their root password to install the package.


There are privilege escalation bugs even on Linux, just the same as there are on Windows. Do a Google - search with "linux privilege escalation" and set the timeframe to search in to one month and you'll still see fresh bugs here and there. If Ubuntu was the top dog instead of Windows you'd most likely see the number of these bugs at least triple.

That is to say that driveby-attacks would certainly be possible under Linux, too.
"

I agree with what you say, but still want to point out that there's a difference between driveby-malware for Linux and Windows, in that in Linux you have to set an executable bit before you can actually execute a binary or script, which makes driveby-attacks a little harder, probably requiring user intervention.

That alone would defeat most of those attacks, IMHO.

Reply Parent Score: 2