Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Jul 2014 13:57 UTC
Games

A while ago, we've announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It's not about them, after all, it's about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com!

Good on 'm.

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RE[3]: This is great news
by Drumhellar on Fri 25th Jul 2014 01:52 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This is great news"
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

- Install an anti virus
- Install non-crap browser
- 18 billion updates
- Install productivity software
- Install media playback software that actually works
- Install drivers for everything that windows doesn't come with
- Optimize the system by removing all of the tat that comes with it.
- Clean the registry after 10 minutes of use


You obviously haven't kept current on Windows.

1. You can hardly fault Windows for needing an antivirus - it comes with the territory of being the number one OS in the world. If you write a virus for windows, it can target >90% of the world's computer users.

2. IE is actually a fairly good browser, and certainly far from crap. I use Firefox myself, but IE has good performance, standards support, and is stable. The only thing it really lacks is a good extension system, but there are plugins that cover a lot of stuff.

3. Updates and drivers - If I install Windows, as long as it has a functional network driver, Windows Update will pull both drivers and updates all at once, and install them all at once. It might take two reboots, but that's fine.

4. Install productivity software - True, but the converse applies to Windows: No having to remove a bunch of software I don't want installed. I tend to not like the default app selection for either Fedora or Ubuntu, and I haven't noticed much difference in other distributions.

5. "Working" media software - WMP works quite well. It'll open most formats without the need of finding third party repos for patent-encumbered formats. The only glaring omission in WMP format support is MKV, but that can be added to WMP quite easily.

6. Drivers - See #2

7. Removing software - I find that I have to remove far more software with Linux than with Windows after a fresh install.

8. Cleaning the registry - I haven't had to do that in years. It's not necessary anymore, since software is generally well behaved

Windows certainly has it's weaknesses, but none of the ones you listed are true anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: This is great news
by shotsman on Fri 25th Jul 2014 06:31 in reply to "RE[3]: This is great news"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Quote:
3. Updates and drivers - If I install Windows, as long as it has a functional network driver, Windows Update will pull both drivers and updates all at once, and install them all at once. It might take two reboots, but that's fine.


IMHO, you have obviously never had to install all the incantations of .NET. For 3.5, 4 etc I counted 11, yes 11 reboots after installing patches.
Thankfully MS got around to remastering the 3.5 kit and now it is down to 4 reboots. Still a lot more than the one I have when I install RHEL/CentOS.

Then... you assume that you don't get any of those arcane hex error numbers from the windows updater along the way.

Yes, not all of us have the luxury of someone else maintaining a WSUS system for us.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: This is great news
by p13. on Fri 25th Jul 2014 08:19 in reply to "RE[3]: This is great news"
p13. Member since:
2005-07-10


1. You can hardly fault Windows for needing an antivirus - it comes with the territory of being the number one OS in the world. If you write a virus for windows, it can target >90% of the world's computer users.


You can. Linux is by far the most popular operating system for hosting websites and other services on the internet.
It's attacked constantly, 24/7. No need for A/V software.
It also runs on most of the world's smartphones.
Windows is insecure, always has been.



2. IE is actually a fairly good browser, and certainly far from crap. I use Firefox myself, but IE has good performance, standards support, and is stable. The only thing it really lacks is a good extension system, but there are plugins that cover a lot of stuff.


It has gotten a lot better, i'll admit. I just don't like it at all. Could be psychological due to it sucking holes in space-time for all these years.


3. Updates and drivers - If I install Windows, as long as it has a functional network driver, Windows Update will pull both drivers and updates all at once, and install them all at once. It might take two reboots, but that's fine.


It won't. Windows updates are not cumulative. They always follow an upgrade path. You'll be rebooting a ton of times, because each time you patch something, it will find new patches for the things you've just patched.


4. Install productivity software - True, but the converse applies to Windows: No having to remove a bunch of software I don't want installed. I tend to not like the default app selection for either Fedora or Ubuntu, and I haven't noticed much difference in other distributions.


Unless you buy a boxed windows set, it will come with tons of useless crap.
Classic manufacturer bloat includes a/v "trials", backup software "trial", tons of browserbars/extensions. Etc etc ...
If you don't like the default app selection for a distro, it's at least easy to replace from within one central package management utility. No running uninstallers, then downloading another installer from some website. Just click and wait.


5. "Working" media software - WMP works quite well. It'll open most formats without the need of finding third party repos for patent-encumbered formats. The only glaring omission in WMP format support is MKV, but that can be added to WMP quite easily.


Mplayer/gstreamer/vlc > WMP
Always, all day, every day.


6. Drivers - See #2


That's if you can get your network card/wifi card working. The problem with windows is it's released every few years, whereas new hardware comes out every few days. Try installing windows 7 on a newly released laptop. Sure, things are better now with 8, but will be the same mess/shit again in one or two years.


7. Removing software - I find that I have to remove far more software with Linux than with Windows after a fresh install.


Such as?
Not that it really matters ...
Win 8 minimal disk space requirements: 20G
Ubuntu 14.04: 4.5G
And that's including all of the software that you don't like.


8. Cleaning the registry - I haven't had to do that in years. It's not necessary anymore, since software is generally well behaved


Granted, it's not as common as it used to be, but i've still had to do it more than a few times.
"Since software is generally well behaved."
Well there's your problem ... it's still possible for one single bit of software to mess up the entire system in windows ...


Windows certainly has it's weaknesses, but none of the ones you listed are true anymore.


It does.
Don't even get me started on windows server 2012.
Whoever thought that metro, complete with charm bar on a @#$%#$ server platform was a good idea should be shot at dawn.
Try working with it in a vmware console, i dare you.

Edited 2014-07-25 08:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: This is great news
by karunko on Fri 25th Jul 2014 09:23 in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
karunko Member since:
2008-10-28

You can. Linux is by far the most popular operating system for hosting websites and other services on the internet.
It's attacked constantly, 24/7. No need for A/V software.

I wouldn't be so smug, if I were you: "New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers" (http://it.slashdot.org/story/14/07/18/1221222/new-mayhem-malware-ta...).

Granted, is not a common occurrence, but it's better to keep in mind that no OS is 100% attack-proof -- unless you're Apple and want to play the "OS X doesn't get any virus" card.

Liking or disliking, on the other hand, is another thing but, you know what? When it comes to getting things done I'm a pragmatist and I have no problem jumping from Windows to OS X to Linux to FreeBSD depending on the task at hand -- or even my mood. In fact I'm grateful that there are so many options.


RT.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: This is great news
by Drumhellar on Fri 25th Jul 2014 19:49 in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Linux is by far the most popular operating system for hosting websites and other services on the internet.
It's attacked constantly, 24/7. No need for A/V software.
It also runs on most of the world's smartphones.
Windows is insecure, always has been.


Windows holds up to external attacks just fine. Typically, virus infections are due to users running infected software, not external attacks. Nothing in Linux prevents this other than it being a small target. Windows is safe to use as an internet-facing server, and it often is used that way.

Unless you buy a boxed windows set, it will come with tons of useless crap.
Classic manufacturer bloat includes a/v "trials", backup software "trial", tons of browserbars/extensions.


Can't blame Windows for OEMs installing shitty software on their computers. The only thing that prevents Dell from installing crapware on their Ubuntu laptops is that there aren't enough users to even bother with it.

If you don't like the default app selection for a distro, it's at least easy to replace from within one central package management utility. No running uninstallers, then downloading another installer from some website. Just click and wait.


Unless the software you want isn't in the repo, which is still common enough in my recent experience. If that's the case, you have to figure out what the dependencies are yourself, make sure you have them (and the devel packages) installed, and hope that there aren't any pissed-off gnomes hiding in the works somewhere getting ready to throw a wrench in things just for the hell of it when you try to build it yourself. Also, hope that updating the rest of your system doesn't break your hand-built software, requiring you to rebuild or even go without.

Yeah, Windows looks like it needs 20GB of disk space, but the WinSXS folder is smaller than Explorer reports (Explorer doesn't handle hard links correctly in size calculations), and that also ensures that my software doesn't break after updates, since older known-working versions of DLLs are available if needed.

I don't have that problem with Windows.

That's if you can get your network card/wifi card working. The problem with windows is it's released every few years, whereas new hardware comes out every few days. Try installing windows 7 on a newly released laptop. Sure, things are better now with 8, but will be the same mess/shit again in one or two years.


This applies to Linux, though, especially when a distro won't/can't include firmware or a binary blob or whatever some WiFi cards need. Then, I have to manually track down a binary blob, make sure it has the correct file name (Oops. Did it get capitalized by mistake? TOO BAD!), is on a filesystem supported during install, and then hope you don't have any weird USB issues that prevent access(admittedly, the USB issues I have are likely either Renesas' or Dell's fault - Windows 8.1 has similar problems with my USB 3.0 controller, and the problems they both experience change depending on if USB emulation is enabled or not in the bios).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: This is great news
by zima on Tue 29th Jul 2014 23:37 in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

> 1. You can hardly fault Windows for needing an antivirus - it comes with the territory of being the number one OS in the world. If you write a virus for windows, it can target >90% of the world's computer users.

You can. Linux is by far the most popular operating system for hosting websites and other services on the internet.
It's attacked constantly, 24/7. No need for A/V software.
It also runs on most of the world's smartphones.
Windows is insecure, always has been.

It matters who the users are ...and if the platform is locked down (as are Android phones, as are corporate deployments of Windows)

Unless you buy a boxed windows set, it will come with tons of useless crap.
Classic manufacturer bloat includes a/v "trials", backup software "trial", tons of browserbars/extensions. Etc etc ...

That seems to depend on the market, I guess - Windows installs which come on laptops are clean where I live.

Mplayer/gstreamer/vlc > WMP
Always, all day, every day.

And Mplayer/VLC are multiplatform... most users of the latter are probably on Windows.

Edited 2014-07-29 23:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: This is great news
by JAlexoid on Fri 25th Jul 2014 11:06 in reply to "RE[3]: This is great news"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Removing software - I find that I have to remove far more software with Linux than with Windows after a fresh install.

Clean Windows install from an OEM version is clean, but not a single preinstalled version of Windows comes free from "sample software".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: This is great news
by Drumhellar on Fri 25th Jul 2014 19:30 in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

but not a single preinstalled version of Windows comes free from "sample software"


That's patently false.

Granted, it's rare from major manufacturers, but saying not a single computer anywhere comes without crapware is disingenuous at best, and plain stupid at worst.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: This is great news
by zima on Tue 29th Jul 2014 23:47 in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

not a single preinstalled version of Windows comes free from "sample software".

That is simply untrue - clean Windows installs are a rule in my place for example. I'd guess that's also the case in Baltic states...

Reply Parent Score: 2