Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Jul 2014 13:57 UTC
Games

A while ago, we've announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It's not about them, after all, it's about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com!

Good on 'm.

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RE[5]: This is great news
by karunko on Fri 25th Jul 2014 09:23 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: This is great news"
karunko
Member since:
2008-10-28

You can. Linux is by far the most popular operating system for hosting websites and other services on the internet.
It's attacked constantly, 24/7. No need for A/V software.

I wouldn't be so smug, if I were you: "New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers" (http://it.slashdot.org/story/14/07/18/1221222/new-mayhem-malware-ta...).

Granted, is not a common occurrence, but it's better to keep in mind that no OS is 100% attack-proof -- unless you're Apple and want to play the "OS X doesn't get any virus" card.

Liking or disliking, on the other hand, is another thing but, you know what? When it comes to getting things done I'm a pragmatist and I have no problem jumping from Windows to OS X to Linux to FreeBSD depending on the task at hand -- or even my mood. In fact I'm grateful that there are so many options.


RT.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: This is great news
by p13. on Fri 25th Jul 2014 09:34 in reply to "RE[5]: This is great news"
p13. Member since:
2005-07-10

I wouldn't be so smug, if I were you: "New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers" (http://it.slashdot.org/story/14/07/18/1221222/new-mayhem-malware-ta...).
Granted, is not a common occurrence, but it's better to keep in mind that no OS is 100% attack-proof -- unless you're Apple and want to play the "OS X doesn't get any virus" card.


It's not about being smug. It's about dismissing the "90% market share" myth. Windows is avoided like the plague in markets where people demand security and reliability. Want to count and compare the number of 0-days and critical vulnerabilities in both platforms?
Nothing is 100% attack proof. It happens, but it will also be fixed quickly with the code open and bare for review by anyone. The times this sort of thing happens in a year can be counted using your hands instead of a calculator.

Add to that that this malware has to be downloaded and run by a user process (or indeed user) before it can do anything. The possible points of entry are the usual suspects ... wordpress, joomla, etc.
IIS has a rich (if you can call it that) history of just running code if you ask it the right way.


Liking or disliking, on the other hand, is another thing but, you know what? When it comes to getting things done I'm a pragmatist and I have no problem jumping from Windows to OS X to Linux to FreeBSD depending on the task at hand -- or even my mood. In fact I'm grateful that there are so many options.


RT.


I'm pragmatic when it comes to work, i'm forced to use windows when the task at hand demands it, and i'll do it.
However, when it comes to being creative and actually getting work done, *UX beats windows every single time.
I like osX, but i don't like where apple is going with it. I own a mac pro, but it runs linux, not osX. My macbook pro is dual boot, but i only boot into osX when i have to nowadays.

Edited 2014-07-25 09:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: This is great news
by WereCatf on Fri 25th Jul 2014 09:53 in reply to "RE[6]: This is great news"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

It's not about being smug. It's about dismissing the "90% market share" myth. Windows is avoided like the plague in markets where people demand security and reliability. Want to count and compare the number of 0-days and critical vulnerabilities in both platforms?
Nothing is 100% attack proof. It happens, but it will also be fixed quickly with the code open and bare for review by anyone. The times this sort of thing happens in a year can be counted using your hands instead of a calculator.


Okay, I'm gonna step in and say that you're ignoring a lot of things. For one, local security issues in the OS itself don't even come to play until the server software itself has gotten compromised and at that point the amount of available bugs and vulnerabilities becomes moot as long as there's even one such available. It's not the OS people hack, it's the server-software running on it, and besides, you don't really even need to gain root or anything on the system as long as you can just make the sever-software serve out infected content. Running stuff on Linux doesn't magically make it secure, nor does running it on Windows magically make it insecure.

As for the 90%-thing: the number of zero-days and such on Linux would definitely go up if Linux was the major player in desktop markets. Why? Because you wouldn't be trying to breach server-software anymore, you'd need local vulnerabilities in the OS itself. On servers people are looking for bugs in server software, on desktops they need OS-bugs.

Also, I haven't heard anyone but fanboys and the ignorant saying that Windows is avoided as a server because of security-issues. No, Linux is chosen because it generally has higher performance and because it can be tailor-made to fit any custom configuration or specific need, Windows can't.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: This is great news
by karunko on Fri 25th Jul 2014 12:18 in reply to "RE[6]: This is great news"
karunko Member since:
2008-10-28

Nothing is 100% attack proof. It happens, but it will also be fixed quickly with the code open and bare for review by anyone.

The code might be available for inspection (definitely a plus) but how many people, except professionals and researchers, actually do that? Take the Heartbleed bug for instance:

- Introduced into OpenSSL's source code repository on December 31, 2011.

- Widespread adoption with OpenSSL version 1.0.1 released on March 14, 2012.

- Reported on April 1, 2014 (and it was no April's Fool).

That's more than two years, so I wouldn't say that free/open necessarily translates to safer. Do I prefer it, given the option? Certainly. Do I assume that everything is rainbows and ponies because of that? No way!


RT.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: This is great news
by present_arms on Fri 25th Jul 2014 16:25 in reply to "RE[5]: This is great news"
present_arms Member since:
2005-07-09

That virus doesn't attack Linux at all. It attacks PHP web applications. They could run on Linux or any other OS. The brute forcing is what the botnet does once it has a foothold on the machine in question, and has nothing to do with the attack vector.

Reply Parent Score: 2