Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 12th Nov 2005 00:34 UTC
SGI and IRIX Silicon Graphics will start showing off the Altix 4000 Monday, the second generation of the company's technical computing machines based on the Linux operating system and Itanium processors.
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RE: pretty sweet
by 0xbadbeef on Sat 12th Nov 2005 01:27 UTC in reply to "pretty sweet"
0xbadbeef
Member since:
2005-11-12

> If I had the need for a supercomputer or a ultra high end graphics workstation SGI would be my first choice.

If you need a supercomputer IBM would be a better and a more stable option. IBM does much better than SGI on TOP500 list. As for the high end graphics workstations, well it is soon to become history since SGI is about to EOL pretty much all MIPS/IRIX gear in their lineup starting next year. SGI is pretty much dead as we know it. This Altix crap powered by Linux/Intanic junk is not going to help them a bit. SGI is currently in a very tight niche lacking pretty much any competitive differentiator -- pretty much the only piece of technology that gives SGI any edge is NUMAflex, the rest (Itanic and Linux included) are just dead weight. SGI would have done much better if they just held on to the much larger market that used their MIPS/IRIX machines (content creation, 3D, broadcast/fil postproduction, etc.). Honestly I would have been much more impressed if they released an updated version of IRIX than this Altix garbage.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: pretty sweet
by re_re on Sat 12th Nov 2005 01:48 in reply to "RE: pretty sweet"
re_re Member since:
2005-07-06

I liked irix better to but I still like SGI, I really hope they pull out of this

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: pretty sweet
by rhavyn on Sat 12th Nov 2005 03:29 in reply to "RE: pretty sweet"
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

SGI would have done much better if they just held on to the much larger market that used their MIPS/IRIX machines (content creation, 3D, broadcast/fil postproduction, etc.).

Now if only someone will go back in time and convince everyone to not ditch MIPS/IRIX. It's not like SGI choose to dump MIPS/IRIX, no one was buying it anymore. That's the reason they switched to Itanium/NT (they switched to NT first, remember), if they didn't switch to something they were going out of business anyways. They might have done better if they had started working on Linux then and released Linux workstations instead of trying to move people from *nix to NT.

Honestly I would have been much more impressed if they released an updated version of IRIX than this Altix garbage.

They already donated all the technology that was worthwhile in IRIX to Linux, why bother updating IRIX now? (I have a feeling this is going to descend into a flamewar where you try and disparage Linux for something or another)

SGI was dead when it became cheaper to buy NT or Linux workstations for design and Linux clusters for rendering.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: pretty sweet
by 0xbadbeef on Sat 12th Nov 2005 04:09 in reply to "RE[2]: pretty sweet"
0xbadbeef Member since:
2005-11-12

> Now if only someone will go back in time and convince everyone to not ditch MIPS/IRIX. It's not like SGI choose to dump MIPS/IRIX, no one was buying it anymore.

That is a load of crap. I was running a fairly large IRIX back in the days when things started to "change" at SGI. SGI could have more than maintained itself if they chose to maintain direction, instead they ran scared shitless from their own products to MS and Intel just because there was too much pro-Windowz/pro-Intel and anti-Unix propaganda at that point in time. Customers could sense the fear and lack of direction at SGI at that time and this is why a lot of customers abandoned SGI (just like our shop, we switched most of the SGI gear to Sun). Again SGI could more than maintain itself if it continued developing MIPS/IRIX and catering to their old mainstay markets, they could have lowered the prices and increased volumes, instead they chose to use somebody else's technology just because it was hyped as the way of the future.

> SGI was dead when it became cheaper to buy NT or Linux workstations for design and Linux clusters for rendering.

Again SGI simply abandoned the workstation market and did not compete. There was opportunity for SGI, they just did not have any balls to compete and just decided to chicken out whoring themselves out to MS and Intel. For some reason Sun which sold workstations in the same space as SGI is still able to sell their Unix workstations and Sun is still #1 technical workstation vendor out there beating all odds against Windows. The reason Sun is still out there is because they always stuck to their own products and core competencies not chasing after hype and this is why customers love Sun and this is why things are starting to really look up for them. SGI could have done the same.

> They already donated all the technology that was worthwhile in IRIX to Linux, why bother updating IRIX now? (I have a feeling this is going to descend into a flamewar where you try and disparage Linux for something or another)

Ha ha, SGI donations to Linux have been so miserable it is not even worth noting. As for IRIX to Linux comparison, IRIX is still more advanced than Linux pretty much across the board and if given choice I would pick IRIX any time of the day. I'm saying that resurrecting IRIX is going to change things in any way though, it is way too late for that, SGI f*cked it all up too much...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: pretty sweet
by dagw on Sat 12th Nov 2005 14:34 in reply to "RE: pretty sweet"
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

If you need a supercomputer IBM would be a better and a more stable option

Except most of those a clusters and not real super computers. If you need a 1024 CPU single image machine sgi is still the company to call. The problem (from sgi's point of view) is that these clusters are getting better and better doing jobs which before where the domain of single image super computers.

SGI would have done much better if they just held on to the much larger market that used their MIPS/IRIX machines (content creation, 3D, broadcast/fil postproduction, etc.).

Although those areas where the big ones from a PR point of view and the reason why most people have heard the name sgi, that is never where they made the big money. The real money came from industry and defence who bought huge visulaization systems and 500+ CPU Origin boxes. What really hurt sgi's bottom line was not losing the content creation business, but the birth of clustering technology, which could compete with their Origin systems for many applications.

Reply Parent Score: 1