Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 19th Sep 2014 23:11 UTC
Google

Oh, right, there's an entirely new version of Android right around the corner. It could be days away, it could be weeks away. We're not totally sure what Google has planned for what is easily the most ambitious and promising update to the platform since Android 2.1. It's easy to forget that there's a whole new world right around the corner, because Android is in this seemingly constant state of change now. We have core apps updating on a regular and consistent bases, manufacturers pushing their apps to the Play Store in order to update them in a timely manner, and the beating heart of the platform is on a six week release cycle. Of all the incredible things that we saw and heard about at Google I/O this year, Sundar Pichai's announcement that Google Play Services would be updating and improving every six weeks is one of those things that didn't get nearly as much attention as it probably should have.

It really is quite remarkable. In some ways, Android is starting to faintly look like a rolling release, with more and more core smartphone applications, as well as several core smartphone APIs, updated continuously through Google Play. The pace is quick, and I like it.

Still, the Android update situation has not been resolved. There's a lot more work to do.

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RE: A LONG way to go
by unclefester on Sat 20th Sep 2014 11:10 UTC in reply to "A LONG way to go"
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13

And yet today there are still flagship Android devices launched with older versions of the OS pre-installed, and with no firm word on if or when they might be able to be updated to the latest version, or even any future version.


Any version of Android since 4.04 is 'good enough'. I have a 4.2.2 phone and a 4.4.2 tablet. The real world differences are negligible. [Even Gingerbread is perfectly usable.]

Unacceptable. When you buy a new iPhone, you get a device that has the latest version of iOS installed ON it, and you have the assurance that your device will be capable of running EVERY future version of iOS for at least the coming 2 years and usually longer.


When you buy a new iPhone you are getting expensive and outdated hardware. The iPhone 6 is arguably no better than a 2012 Nexus 4.

Yes, there are cheapo Android phones out there meant for "emerging markets" that have no use for the features in the latest OS version, but to launch a flagship "next great thing" phone with a 1-2 year old version of the OS is just ridiculous.


Total BS. Flagships always have a very recent version of Android. Even the current sub $100 models have 4.2 (many have 4.4).

Apps do get updated on a regular basis, but that's a whole other matter than if you buy a top of the line Android phone and it comes with a year-old version of Android OS and will never be able to be upgraded.


More BS. If you buy a CURRENT flagship you get the LATEST version of Android (eg KitKat). If you buy an OUTDATED 12 month old phone you (obviously) don't get the latest version of Android. Nearly all flagships get at least one update.

Your article talked about the "insane pace of Android" but it's really about the more frequent pace of app updates.


Updating the apps upgrades virtually every bit of user software.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: A LONG way to go
by shotsman on Sat 20th Sep 2014 13:51 in reply to "RE: A LONG way to go"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

iPhone uses outdated hardware?

so your Android runs 64bit software then?
What about the TouchId that IMHO is far better than anything that Samsung can produce at the moment.

As for expensive H/W I saw a report that it costs Apple $338 to make an iPhone 6. It might cost a lot more than many Android devices including my old Samsung Galaxy Mini but they seem to be not cutting the corners that some other handset makers are doing in their race to the bottom.

Please tell us why you think that the hardware is outdated?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: A LONG way to go
by unclefester on Sun 21st Sep 2014 00:45 in reply to "RE[2]: A LONG way to go"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13


so your Android runs 64bit software then?
What about the TouchId that IMHO is far better than anything that Samsung can produce at the moment.


Apple uses 64bit as another marketing gimmick. It offers no real advantages at this stage. Real world benchmarks show that Apple phones are slower than other flagships.

Apple is a a design studio. ALL their hardware is produced by other companies. SAMSUNG makes the Apple 64 bit CPU.

As for expensive H/W I saw a report that it costs Apple $338 to make an iPhone 6. It might cost a lot more than many Android devices including my old Samsung Galaxy Mini but they seem to be not cutting the corners that some other handset makers are doing in their race to the bottom.


There is NO way an iPhone 6 costs $338 to build. The hardware is only marginally better than the sub $200 Moto G. Apple simply sells mid range hardware at very high prices.

Please tell us why you think that the hardware is outdated?


The iPhone 5C = Galaxy S2 (Feb 2011). iPhone 6 = Nexus 4 (Nov 2012). iPhone 6+ = galaxy Note 3 (Sep 2013).

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: A LONG way to go
by leos on Sat 20th Sep 2014 23:19 in reply to "RE: A LONG way to go"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21



Any version of Android since 4.04 is 'good enough'. I have a 4.2.2 phone and a 4.4.2 tablet. The real world differences are negligible. [Even Gingerbread is perfectly usable.]


So the pace of innovation on android is apparently insane, and yet there are negligible differences between the current version and that from over 2 years ago. Which is it?



When you buy a new iPhone you are getting expensive and outdated hardware. The iPhone 6 is arguably no better than a 2012 Nexus 4.


One might argue you have no idea what you are talking about. Seriously the two aren't remotetly the same aside from superficial stuff like screen size.


More BS. If you buy a CURRENT flagship you get the LATEST version of Android (eg KitKat). If you buy an OUTDATED 12 month old phone you (obviously) don't get the latest version of Android. Nearly all flagships get at least one update.


It's telling that you think it's normal for a slightly older model not to run the latest OS, or that you think getting at least one update is anything but embarrassing.

Edited 2014-09-20 23:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: A LONG way to go
by dpJudas on Sun 21st Sep 2014 05:09 in reply to "RE[2]: A LONG way to go"
dpJudas Member since:
2009-12-10

So the pace of innovation on android is apparently insane, and yet there are negligible differences between the current version and that from over 2 years ago. Which is it?

A bit of both. ;)

The truth is, bragging about a 6 week release cycle is mostly just hot air. It just the same as the 37 (!!) releases of Chrome and who knows how many of Firefox.

The development speed hasn't increased one bit. What has changed with such a model is how long a patch rests in the master branch of the respective projects before it hits the users.

The catch of such a release model is that getting a known stable version gets far more difficult because there's constantly landing new changes. This is the story they never tell. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: A LONG way to go
by wocowboy on Sun 21st Sep 2014 12:59 in reply to "RE: A LONG way to go"
wocowboy Member since:
2006-06-01

Sorry, but I just won't settle for "good enough".

Reply Parent Score: 1