Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 13th Nov 2014 12:47 UTC
Microsoft

Microsoft is sending a clear message that it wants to reach consumers on popular mobile platforms. That's an understandable move, but with a lack of a true Windows Phone flagship this holiday and hints that unique features like Cortana will make their way to Android and iOS, it leaves Windows Phone in an odd spot. If all of Microsoft's core apps and services work better on Android and iOS, it makes Windows Phone a lot less appealing. If Microsoft can’t even make good apps for Windows, there's not a lot of hope left for third-party app developers to build for Microsoft's mobile platform. Couple that with the Windows tablet and phone app gap, and the future looks increasingly bleak. Appealing to Android and iOS users might be Microsoft's goal, but there's only so long Windows users will remain loyal.

While Microsoft has shifted focus back on traditional desktop Windows, Windows' Metro environment and Windows Phone seem to be on a path towards irrelevance. Microsoft's own applications for these platforms suck, third party applications generally suck or do not exist at all, while Microsoft's applications on iOS and Android are thriving and well-received.

It's easy to read too much into this - but it's also very hard not to.

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RE: Comment by Dano
by jnemesh on Fri 14th Nov 2014 17:45 UTC in reply to "Comment by Dano"
jnemesh
Member since:
2008-04-08

Yup, they are definitely big! Which is the problem. Remember the days when IBM ruled desktop computing? They lost out to the much smaller, more nimble Microsoft. Now MS is far larger than IBM was...and even LESS responsive to changes in the market! Just look at what they have been doing lately:

1) trying to "own" the living room with Xbox...when the real battle is in mobile devices.

2) arriving YEARS late to the smartphone market, killing off Nokia in the process of trying to establish even a TINY foothold in that market.

3) arriving YEARS late to the tablet market, and succeeding only in making very expensive ipad stands.

4) destroying their Windows brand with "Metro" and a closed ecosystem.

So yeah, they are large...but in this industry that is NOT a positive!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Dano
by Dano on Fri 14th Nov 2014 20:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by Dano"
Dano Member since:
2006-01-22

Yup, they are definitely big! Which is the problem. Remember the days when IBM ruled desktop computing?


Microsoft is not IBM. IBM tried to make everyone stay with proprietary hardware and software with no advantage, and without proper marketing (see how they dropped the ball with OS/2). Microsoft is going in just the opposite direction.

1) trying to "own" the living room with Xbox...when the real battle is in mobile devices.


XBOX is just a small part of Microsoft. Obviously it's that divisions job to try and own the living room because no one really does yet.

2) arriving YEARS late to the smartphone market, killing off Nokia in the process of trying to establish even a TINY foothold in that market.


Microsoft got Nokia for a song. Just the application work on WP8 and patents were worth it. The hardware part was just a bonus.



3) arriving YEARS late to the tablet market, and succeeding only in making very expensive ipad stands.


Surface Pro 3 is no slouch, and is making in roads despite what peoples opinion say. Surface 4 is on the way. Running desktop apps on a tablet is a new concept in itself and if MS did not get it 100% right on the first time out, I suspect Win 10 will rectify many issues. Apps store has been growing and is over 1/2 million apps at this point. iPad, no. Progress? for sure.



4) destroying their Windows brand with "Metro" and a closed ecosystem.


Metro was not something that would take over the desktop that I believed some people at MS believed, but many of those leaders are gone. Metro will be molded into something that can be used in the start menu and on touch devices. It's still better than GNOME lol

So yeah, they are large...but in this industry that is NOT a positive!


Being large makes it easier to make small mistakes. MS is in many areas, many of which make a lot of cash. What happens when people are hooked on Office on iPad, Android and iPhone? They start buying services, add ons and subscriptions. They buy an Xbox, it's a subscription. OneDrive? You guessed it, cloud subscription. MS's online model will surpass Google's offerings.

What I don't get is for years everyone is bitching about how MS should bring their software and services to other platforms, and now the new CEO says anything goes and people still dump on the company.

Edited 2014-11-14 20:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3