Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Apr 2015 12:25 UTC
Android

Rumors of a Microsoft and Cyanogen partnership have been making the rounds recently, and the Android mod maker is confirming them today. In an email to The Verge, Cyanogen says it's partnering with Microsoft to integrate the software giant’s consumer apps and services into the Cyanogen OS. Bing, Skype, OneDrive, OneNote, Outlook, and Microsoft Office will all be bundled later this year. As part of the partnership, Microsoft has committed to creating "native integrations" on Cyanogen OS.

"Taking Android away from Google" to give it to Microsoft. Will these people never learn?

Cyanogen just signed its own death warrant with this. I knew Cyanogen would be going down the drain the moment they started courting venture capitalists.

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satan666
Member since:
2008-04-18

The investigation is looking at its actions between 2006 and 2012, so this wont (in theory) wont affect the ruling.

Well, Android has been open source from the beginning, so everybody could modify Android and do anything they wanted with it. Honestly, I think the EU investigation is utter crap. The OEMs have always had the choice to use alternative apps in Android, they just chose not to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

they are investigating if that is actually true ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

puenktchen Member since:
2007-07-27

The open antitrust case against google is about google search and google manipulating the search results in favour of their other offerings.

The EU has also been investigating Android licensing, but not because someone complained about the app bundling but MS and Nokia complained because google is 1. giving away the OS for free 2.puts licences under pressure not to use other mobile OS 3. and to bundle only their apps like youtube

All those antitrust investigations have a certain merit. And you could at least think about the antitrust implications of Google Play Services too, an Android without them is more and more crippled as to much apps need them.

Reply Parent Score: 4

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

And you could at least think about the antitrust implications of Google Play Services too, an Android without them is more and more crippled as to much apps need them.


And that's a good thing, IMO. It keeps Android from becoming the same splintered mess that desktop Linux is. Personally? I like being able to get 99% of my apps from one source, and knowing that the latest version is always going to be there. vs. having 30 different flavors of Android, each with their own app store.

Reply Parent Score: 2