Linked by David Adams on Tue 14th Jul 2015 23:21 UTC
Original OSNews Interviews From Linux Voice: "Perl 6 has been 15 years in the making, and is now due to be released at the end of this year. We speak to its creator to find out what’s going on."
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RE[3]: Why perl?
by Wondercool on Wed 15th Jul 2015 15:58 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Why perl?"
Wondercool
Member since:
2005-07-08

In natural language you wouldn't expect people to all speak the same sentence for the same situation or even the same language.

How boring would it be if all would always say 'Good day' instead of 'Hi', 'How are you?', 'Nice day', 'Bonjour'

The exercise of a computer language is to create a language that is understandable by humans while still possible to compile into something the machine understands.

I don't like forcing people into a certain format.
An example would be:

if ($opt_v) {
print “Some verbose message \n”;
}
Vs.
$opt_v && print “Some verbose message\n”;
Vs.
print “Some verbose message\n” unless !$opt_v
Vs.
print “Some verbose message\n” if $opt_v

Why would I force a programmer to use exactly one of these methods? The more expressive the language, the greater chance of creating beauty, IMHO.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Why perl?
by Delgarde on Wed 15th Jul 2015 21:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Why perl?"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

The more expressive the language, the greater chance of creating beauty, IMHO.


It's a programming language, not a human one. It's not supposed to be beautiful - it's supposed to be functional, and it's supposed to be maintainable. Beauty is a bonus.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Why perl?
by Wondercool on Wed 15th Jul 2015 22:13 in reply to "RE[4]: Why perl?"
Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

I strongly disagree with that sentiment. If that's the case why aren't we all programming in Fortran or Cobol? Both are perfectly functional and Cobol particularly is quite maintainable and easy to read.

Also - and this is hard to define, it is a subjective feeling - it seems to me that elegant, pleasant, concise, well formatted, 'beautiful' code is easy to maintain rather than the stuff that just fits the coding standards of the company.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Why perl?
by WorknMan on Thu 16th Jul 2015 02:08 in reply to "RE[3]: Why perl?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Why would I force a programmer to use exactly one of these methods? The more expressive the language, the greater chance of creating beauty, IMHO.


Personally, I'll take readability over beauty any day. I don't give a damn if it looks 'boring' or not.

Reply Parent Score: 3