Linked by charlieg on Sun 19th Jul 2015 15:05 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives

A significant new development as Haiku continues pushing towards a stable release.

Since the switch to our package manager, there was no longer a way to influence the boot process at all. The only file you could change was the UserBootscript which is started only after Tracker and Deskbar; the whole system is already up at this point.

The launch_daemon gives the power back to you, but also allow software you install to automatically be started on system boot as well. You can also even prevent system components from being started at all if you so wish.

A summary of features:

Furthermore, it allows for event based application start, start on demand, a multi-threaded boot process, and even enables you to talk to servers before they actually started.

Read the full article for a detailed description.

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Mmm
by gfx1 on Mon 20th Jul 2015 09:53 UTC
gfx1
Member since:
2006-01-20

The fun part of BeOS was that you could take a drive out of one machine put it in another and everything still worked. (if you had the supported hardware) Windows just died when you did that.
Does a systemd thing breaks that kind of behaviour?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Mmm
by looncraz on Mon 20th Jul 2015 10:04 in reply to "Mmm"
looncraz Member since:
2005-07-24

The fun part of BeOS was that you could take a drive out of one machine put it in another and everything still worked. (if you had the supported hardware) Windows just died when you did that.
Does a systemd thing breaks that kind of behaviour?


No, not at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Mmm
by Morgan on Mon 20th Jul 2015 12:43 in reply to "Mmm"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Windows just died when you did that.


Actually with the right preparation you can successfully swap a Windows drive to another system. You have to go into the device manager and set the drive controller to the Windows generic one before you swap. I don't know if this is necessary (or even possible) in Windows 8 and up, but it works like a charm in Windows 7 and lower. If you forget to do that beforehand (or if it isn't possible, i.e. your old motherboard has died), you can usually go into safe mode and reset the drive controller, then boot normally and it will pick up the correct new drivers.

Of course, you then have to contend with licensing/activation issues since you've just changed most of the hardware, which is not an issue with most other OSes.

Edited 2015-07-20 12:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Mmm
by Drumhellar on Mon 20th Jul 2015 16:42 in reply to "RE: Mmm"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Well, Windows 8 has an option for installing onto a USB drive meant for moving from computer to computer.

Another option (And, the one I always used) was to nuke HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/System/CurrentControlSet/Enum

Very useful when ALL of your hardware changes - like, say, pulling your drive out of an Intel-based computer with ATI graphics and putting it into an AMD system with nVidia graphics.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Mmm
by CapEnt on Mon 20th Jul 2015 13:19 in reply to "Mmm"
CapEnt Member since:
2005-12-18

Does a systemd thing breaks that kind of behaviour?


No. It's more likely that the problem would be Grub and fstab in that case, and only if you still has that really bad behavior of the old days of using Linux drive naming convention instead of UUID in their configuration.

Reply Parent Score: 3