Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Jul 2015 10:21 UTC
Internet & Networking

Rupert Loman, owner of Gamer Network which boasts Eurogamer, Games Industry, Rock Paper Shotgun, VG247 and more within its network of sites, says that ad-blockers are a real threat to the future of journalism.

"Ad blocking is probably the biggest existential threat to the future of online games journalism," he told MCV.

Cry me a river.

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Comment by unixfish
by unixfish on Thu 23rd Jul 2015 11:32 UTC
unixfish
Member since:
2012-11-28

Slippery slope here. If "the industry" were to prevent ad blocking, what's next? Spam Filtering? We will be seeing articles about how "companies cannot make money because their Email is not getting to the designated recipient. These are honest companies trying to get the word out on the goods they have to offer." Then we will see clients changed so you cannot filter Email, have to open an Email before you delete it, and have it open for 15 seconds so that it seems you "read it".

This is way overstated, but not too far off from what seems to be happening. The DVR manufacturers are being sued by the networks for making a "commercial skip" feature available. The internet is trying to find ways to force us to see ads. The whole problem is that there are so many ads, we have become desensitized to them, so it's becoming an arms race to get our attention. Hence the obnoxious flashy and video ads.

This will not end well.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by unixfish
by kittynipples on Thu 23rd Jul 2015 16:40 in reply to "Comment by unixfish"
kittynipples Member since:
2006-08-02

More fundamentally, the problem is that people expect everything to be provided to them for free. The proliferation of modern web services provides massive utility to users, but the users seldom want to pay.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by unixfish
by leech on Thu 23rd Jul 2015 19:47 in reply to "RE: Comment by unixfish"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

More fundamentally, the problem is that people expect everything to be provided to them for free. The proliferation of modern web services provides massive utility to users, but the users seldom want to pay.


I don't know about you, but I pay for my Internet service. Imagine if Game of Thrones was broken up with commercials, you'd be pissed right? Because you pay for HBO as a service. Well I pay CenturyLink for a service, I don't want it to be interrupted by ads.

This problem of them not getting revenue because a lot of people use adblock would not have been a problem if they had kept the ads minimal in the first place.

When you're trying to read through an article and it's formatting is bouncing to the far left and then far right because ads are interspersed between, you start to just give up on reading such things, making having an Internet account almost pointless.

I am on a few sites that basically give you ads unless you login with a free registration account and I really don't have a problem with that, since you tend to contribute to sites where you have accounts.

But really, when a single website can kill the performance of your whole computer because of some horribly designed ad, you know that journalism on that site isn't worth reading. So I say 'meh' to those ass hats.

Reply Parent Score: 4