Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 14th Aug 2015 17:31 UTC, submitted by Adurbe
Legal

The ongoing legal saga known as the Oracle-Google copyright battle took a huge leap Wednesday when Oracle claimed the last six Android operating systems are "infringing Oracle's copyrights in the Java platform."

That's according to the latest paperwork Oracle filed in the five-year-old closely watched case that so far has resulted in the determination that Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are, indeed, copyrightable.

Oracle is the cesspit of the industry. What a horrible, horrible company.

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Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

Using APIs is not stealing. Even portraying it as copyright infringement is highly questionable.

Reply Parent Score: 12

stormcrow Member since:
2015-03-10

Using APIs and therefore header files should be "fair use" I agree as a matter of compatibility especially since it would severely damage an already artificially strained software industry with all the questionable software and design patents issued by a rubber stamp USPTO. Under US copyright law it's not at all clear if header files that form an API can be covered by a copyright. The Appeals Court has already ruled that the judge erred on point of law on that ruling and it requires further review. Artificial words and languages *are* covered by US copyright law as meriting copyright protection. And whatever we may consider computer languages as generally fair use, they are entirely artificial.

I certainly agree that Oracle is a company with no ethics and a horrid PR record, but they have brought up valid questions as far as US copyright law is concerned and the question on functional header files needs to be addressed rather than assumed it's alright to borrow them. All players in the software industry would rather that can of worms be left closed, but since it is opened, this needs to play out and US copyright law needs to be brought to the reality of what copyright is going to have to become in an increasingly electronically connected global community. Will US copyright (and patent) laws reasonably accommodate interoperability, or will they continue to stifle it?

Reply Parent Score: 6

shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

The whole issue of header files came up in SCO vs IBM

Google for "SCO errno.h" and you can see the whole story.

That case came down on the side of IBM and that files like 'errno'h' were not subject to copyright In that case
While (IANAL) header files do not an API make, they go a long way towards making the case that they aren't copyrightable.

As Thom says, Oracle (in particular their CEO and legal dept) are scum. (I was a former Oracle DBA, much to my shame now)

Reply Parent Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Temcat,

Using APIs is not stealing. Even portraying it as copyright infringement is highly questionable.


The court with the highest authority in the US refused to block API copyrights, so now we're stuck with them. "Highly questionable" indeed. Actually no, that's too kind, it's f#@*!1ng moronic!

Reply Parent Score: 8

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

The court with the highest authority in the US refused to block API copyrights, so now we're stuck with them. "Highly questionable" indeed. Actually no, that's too kind, it's f#@*!1ng moronic!


I think it's bad for developers, but good for businesses. If I spend hundreds of thousands developing and implementing an API for my platform, at least I know my competitors can't steal it for themselves and poach my customers without giving me something in return.

Reply Parent Score: 1