Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Aug 2015 23:18 UTC
Windows This hit the news yesterday.

Microsoft released Windows 10 four weeks ago today, and now the company is providing a fresh update on its upgrade figures. 14 million machines had been upgraded to Windows 10 within 24 hours of the operating system release last month, and that figure has now risen to more than 75 million in just four weeks.

As somebody who uses Windows every day, and who upgraded to Windows 10 a few weeks before it was released, let me make a statement about all the positive Windows 10 reviews that not everyone is going to like. There are only two reasons Windows 10 is getting positive reviews. First, because it's free. This one's a given. Second, and more importantly: Windows 10 is getting positive reviews because none of the reviewers have forced themselves to use nothing but Metro applications.

Here's the cold and harsh truth as I see it: despite all the promises, Metro applications are still complete and utter garbage. Let me explain why.

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Several points
by ddc_ on Fri 28th Aug 2015 11:25 UTC
ddc_
Member since:
2006-12-05

Well, Edge's URL bar is actually not that problematic: after all the search bar acts exactly the same as URL bar in every aspect.

Mail app is a complete disaster. They managed to do everything just as wrong as they could: threads are traversed from new to old, messages can't be just plain text, URLs in plain text messages can't be easily selected (and are not parsed, which may be OK), answer is put above quotation by default, etc. For the sake of consistency it should also mangle IMAP and automatically subscribe to spam.

What troubles me much more is Microsoft's handling of input:

• Keyboard layouts are not configurable: I can't add or remove additional symbols. On Windows 7, Sailfish and all XKB-based systems I could make my own layout and share it between languages I need, but on Windows 8, 8.1 and 10 I am out of luck. Despite many user requests Microsoft refuses to update KLC to make it produce proper layouts for Windows 8, 8.1 and 10. In the end I am forced to using two latin and two cyrillic layouts instead of two altogether.
• Layouts for physical and virtual keyboards are strongly coupled. I have a US English keyboard for my tablet, but normally I use Yugoslav layout, so I'd rather have US only for physical keyboard and Yugoslav for virtual. I can't. All Unix-like systems (including Android) allow that.
• Input prediction is tied to orthography test. In some contexts I can't use only one of them. As a consequence, if I choose to enable them, Windows would silently replace what I typed with something it thought I wanted to type, with no easy way to change text back. Provided that offline prediction sucks for some of languages I use, the result is often horrible.

This is a trainwreck, particularly provided that even Sailfish developers with their limited resourced could get it right.

P.S.: There are other things done wrong in Windows 10. But in the end my overall experience with Windows 10 tablet is still better then with iPads I had my hands on, as well as with Android tablets. Being able to run desktop programs is a big deal, and Universal apps are not half that bad with keyboard and mouse as are most iOS and Android apps...

Edited 2015-08-28 11:28 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Several points
by Lennie on Sat 29th Aug 2015 17:11 in reply to "Several points"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

This is a trainwreck, particularly provided that even Sailfish developers with their limited resourced could get it right.


I could be wrong but a large part of that code/knowledge was probably already created by Nokia in the years before it was called Sailfish.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Several points
by ddc_ on Sat 29th Aug 2015 23:14 in reply to "RE: Several points"
ddc_ Member since:
2006-12-05

I could be wrong but a large part of that code/knowledge was probably already created by Nokia in the years before it was called Sailfish.

The culmination of Nokia efforts - N900 - was released on 11 November 2009, soon after Microsoft started to work on Windows 8 and 3 years before it was released to manufecturing. Obviously, Microsoft had enough time to get familiar with all of Nokia's results, particularly provided that Maemo was opensource, and at least some people from Microsoft had direct access to all Nokia's mobile assets well before Windows 10 release date.

Reply Parent Score: 2