Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Aug 2015 23:18 UTC
Windows This hit the news yesterday.

Microsoft released Windows 10 four weeks ago today, and now the company is providing a fresh update on its upgrade figures. 14 million machines had been upgraded to Windows 10 within 24 hours of the operating system release last month, and that figure has now risen to more than 75 million in just four weeks.

As somebody who uses Windows every day, and who upgraded to Windows 10 a few weeks before it was released, let me make a statement about all the positive Windows 10 reviews that not everyone is going to like. There are only two reasons Windows 10 is getting positive reviews. First, because it's free. This one's a given. Second, and more importantly: Windows 10 is getting positive reviews because none of the reviewers have forced themselves to use nothing but Metro applications.

Here's the cold and harsh truth as I see it: despite all the promises, Metro applications are still complete and utter garbage. Let me explain why.

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RE[2]: Spot on...
by novad on Fri 28th Aug 2015 18:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Spot on..."
novad
Member since:
2010-06-10

As far as I know you can re-use your old license key and reinstall Windows with it (There is a limit to the number of times you can do it but this limit is quite high)

The worst that could happen is that the automatic registration process fails and that you have to call a MS registration center (Number is shown in the registration window if required) for them to "unlock" your key.

I had allready to do it in other contexts and it always took less than 3 minutes.

As always... This is just my own experience. Do it at your own risk ;)

P.S: If you take some hours to get used to the new interface and to discover all the possible tweeks that you can make, there is only a very little chance that you want to go back to 7

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Spot on...
by shotsman on Fri 28th Aug 2015 19:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Spot on..."
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22


P.S: If you take some hours to get used to the new interface and to discover all the possible tweeks that you can make, there is only a very little chance that you want to go back to 7


If is not just the UI that we don't like. We don't like the spying and the forced update policy. This is just wrong, so wrong.

When the lawyers have finished with MS they may change their mind but somehow I doubt it.
All it needs is enough users to have their system borked by a forced update for the class action suits to start flying in the direction of Redmond. No amount of wriggling will get them out of this.
Then there is the EU. I would think that there are some laws over here that will put a stop to this including the Computer Misuse Act (UK). EULA's don't have any legal standing here because they are only agreed to post sale.

At the moment, there are more than enough reasons to avoid this until these things get settled.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Spot on...
by novad on Fri 28th Aug 2015 20:00 in reply to "RE[3]: Spot on..."
novad Member since:
2010-06-10

At the moment, there are more than enough reasons to avoid this until these things get settled.


Good. Don't like it don't use it. It's your right.

The automatic update problem does only exist outside of the enterprise. Corporate "enterprise" Windows 10 does not require automatic updates.

And if there is an European ruling there will be a Win10E (just an example) for Europe without the automatic update process. It's not the first time MS has to do it and it's certainly not a big deal.

BTW... I've heard for YEARS people complaining on OSN that there is no mandatory update mechanism in Windows and that, contrary to (put the name of your favorite OS) you have old and unpatched versions still running. This is now resolved and what now? The traditional anti-MS bashing.

You also use "we" in a bit too generalist way... Your opinion is yours. I'm part of WE as well as many others and certainly don't share it.

I don't like spying either... But as long as you have a phone, a social media account (even linkedin) or whatever fidelity card, you already sold your privacy.

If people learned to configure decently the settings of their OS (including W10), their "privacy" would be sensibly as well preserved as it is under W7 now.

Edit : Typo

Edited 2015-08-28 20:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1