Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Sep 2015 15:13 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless

For the past few years, we've been in a relatively healthy balance when it comes to our smartphones. Both Apple and Google provided us with relatively decent platforms that were pretty straightforward to use, provided us with interesting and useful functionality, and at mostly decent price points. In return, we accepted a certain amount of lock-in, a certain lack of control over our devices and the software platforms running on them. I felt comfortable with this trade-off, whether I was using an iPhone or an Android phone at the time.

Recently, however, I've been feeling like this balance in iOS and Android is tipping - and not in the right direction. The users' interests have taken a decided backseat to corporate interests, and the user experiences of the two platforms in question have, consequently, suffered, and I see little in the future to counteract this development

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mistersoft
Member since:
2011-01-05

Dear Leos,

I'm not sure if you're being deliberately obtuse or somewhat missing Thom's point -


which I understand to be that, with Apple providing in browser ad-blocking at the OS level, then if users switch on ad-blocking - or more likely it's enabled by default, then website news outlets funded by on-page advertising (of which their are many outlets) - will be forced, economically, to enter Apple's app ecosystem (and thereby have far less choice over which advertising partners they go with and consequently what revenue streams are available)

--and thereby-- Apple is by-proxy having a pretty controlling influence over your available News media

(in theory at least)

Reply Parent Score: 13

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

which I understand to be that, with Apple providing in browser ad-blocking at the OS level, then if users switch on ad-blocking - or more likely it's enabled by default, then website news outlets funded by on-page advertising (of which their are many outlets) - will be forced, economically, to enter Apple's app ecosystem (and thereby have far less choice over which advertising partners they go with and consequently what revenue streams are available)

--and thereby-- Apple is by-proxy having a pretty controlling influence over your available News media

(in theory at least)


It's funny that you are being voted up despite everything you say being factually incorrect.

Let's see.

1. "Apple providing in browser ad-blocking at the OS level" It's in safari, not the OS. Apple is also not providing ad-blocking at all, they are providing an extension framework that supports ad blockers. Exactly like Mozilla and Google have extension frameworks in their browsers.

2. "then if users switch on ad-blocking - or more likely it's enabled by default" Not only is it not enabled by default, you can't even switch it on. You have to install an ad-blocking app from the app store.

3. " then website news outlets funded by on-page advertising (of which their are many outlets) - will be forced, economically, to enter Apple's app ecosystem" Wrong. When you run Adblock on your PC you are depriving publishers of revenue. When you run adblock on your iOS device, you are doing the same. Neither option forces publishers into anything, or if you want, Adblock on the PC "forces" publishers into the apple news app just as much as adblocking on iOS does.

Reply Parent Score: 1