Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Sep 2015 22:46 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes

OOSMOS stands for Object-Oriented State Machine Operating System. It is a new type of operating system where the fundamental contextual unit is the object, not the thread as it is in traditional operating systems.

Because there are no threads, there are no thread stacks, so OOSMOS is ideal for use in memory constrained environments where a traditional thread-based operating system is not a viable option.

Thread beginning with comment 617267
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: Dumb
by jockm on Sun 6th Sep 2015 02:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Dumb"
jockm
Member since:
2012-12-22

Multi threaded and OO kernels actually save resources and provide better responsiveness than round robin scheduling.


You have some data to back that up? While I think it is possible that some multi-threaded and/or OO kernels can be better in those regards; I don't think you can make a blanket statement on the matter.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Dumb
by Dano on Sun 6th Sep 2015 13:42 in reply to "RE[3]: Dumb"
Dano Member since:
2006-01-22

You obviously don't understand what you are talking about. With multi threaded systems you can respond to tasks much faster than round Robin and you also don't have to write scheduling code which eliminates a ton memory consumption in your code. I laugh at you guys willing to accept every concept presented in a technical way as new and novel without questioning what is presented. "It would be so cool to make an OS based on this concept" why? So you would have an unresponsive memory hog?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Dumb
by jockm on Sun 6th Sep 2015 14:03 in reply to "RE[4]: Dumb"
jockm Member since:
2012-12-22

First off, I asked you for data for your assertion, and what you give me is an argument. Where is your data?

...and you also don't have to write scheduling code which eliminates a ton memory consumption in your code.


What now? How do you think threads work? They are managed by the same kind of scheduling code we are talking about.

I make no claims about this particular implementation, but by basing it around programs written as state machines, it unravels the system into a series of events. Therefor there is no explicit reason this approach is necessarily slower than a threaded approach

I laugh at you guys willing to accept every concept presented in a technical way as new and novel without questioning what is presented.


Please point me to where I said anything like that.

All I said it was interesting, and it is. Writing embedded systems as state machines is a well known technique, there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea. Therefore an "os" that is built around that concept could be useful.

Nowhere did I give it a ringing endorsement.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Dumb
by Alfman on Sun 6th Sep 2015 14:24 in reply to "RE[4]: Dumb"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Dano,

If you don't understand the implementation details then how can you question the projects claims?


I'm familiar with the model because I've used the model in my own software. Regarding OOSMOS implementation I'm going by the documentation, not the source code. If you've gone through the source code and can debunk any of my assumptions, them I'm all ears. But until then you can get off your high horse because this "rebuttal" applies as much to you as it does to me.

A second year computer science student can see the problems with the project immediately.


Redirecting and discrediting my education...is that really an argument? There is still a good opportunity for a real technical discussion and even debate, lets not drag this down into personal attacks.

Why, technically, do you feel that a state machine is an unresponsive memory hog? Why do you think it's not event driven?

Edited 2015-09-06 14:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3