Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Dec 2015 00:09 UTC
Amiga & AROS

Two major developments related to Linux hosted version of AROS reached significant milestones in November. Jyrki Koivisto continued development of the USB driver that communicates directly to Linux USB subsystem and brought it to a state where storage devices now can be accessed on the AROS side. Second development, the ALSA based AHI driver developed by Krzysztof Smiechowicz reached release level and is now included in the AROS nightly builds. It replaces the obsolete OSS based driver. This development was done based on bounty hosted by Power2People.org and this bounty has been closed as well.

While on topic of bounties, a bounty to deliver a working implementation of FUSE filesystem and read/write driver for NTFS filesystem has been completed by Frederik Wikstrom. The bounty was also hosted by Power2People.org. The sources of the port are not yet integrated into AROS, but are freely available on GitHub.

AROS has finally been posting development news on its website again, making it a little easier to follow what's going on. Great progress!

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tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

> It's a mark of people becoming too lazy/impatient to create their own platform.

Actually it's a mark of the "PC" platform being so horrifically complicated to support that you need hundreds of megabytes of driver code to be sure that things will work on most users' PCs. None of it would be necessary if indie OS devs targeted a fixed, standardized platform like a single dev board until the OS was finished and added more drivers later.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Which single dev board? You'll need drivers for all chip sets,or get the chip set makers to give you a binary blob and tell you how to work with it. Even what seems simple, really isn't.

Any real dev boards you can point to today that have been around for five years, continuously sold and available without any modifications that would require software updates?

Reply Parent Score: 2

demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

Actually it's a mark of the "PC" platform being so horrifically complicated to support that you need hundreds of megabytes of driver code to be sure that things will work on most users' PCs. None of it would be necessary if indie OS devs targeted a fixed, standardized platform like a single dev board until the OS was finished and added more drivers later.


It's not as if writing drivers was an exact science & simple to do back in the earlier days of computing history. It was still pretty complex back in the early 1990's. The only difference is that most of the complexity is now in dealing with the hardware. In the past, it was a matter of dealing with the operating system. And in those days, the drivers were usually written in assembly. I've yet to see a coherent DDK for Windows 3.1. And then there're the drivers for OS/2 & VMS. Consider doing these drivers without the luxury of what the PCI bus (or any derivative of it) provides.

It probably would've been nice if the Uniform Driver Interface project http://udi.certek.com had became a popular standard.

Edited 2015-12-05 01:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

jpkx1984 Member since:
2015-01-06

Yes, number of hardware to support is overwhelming. However, I can see an alternative approach to using Linux kernel - to target only VM/paravirtualized environments. This way one has to support 'hardware' provided by given hypervisor only.

Reply Parent Score: 2