Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 2nd Jan 2016 19:09 UTC
Internet & Networking

Let me start by saying that beautiful websites come in all sizes and page weights. I love big websites packed with images. I love high-resolution video. I love sprawling Javascript experiments or well-designed web apps.

This talk isn't about any of those. It's about mostly-text sites that, for unfathomable reasons, are growing bigger with every passing year.

While I'll be using examples to keep the talk from getting too abstract, I'm not here to shame anyone, except some companies (Medium) that should know better and are intentionally breaking the web.

This is an amazing and hilarious read we can all agree with it. I doubt there's going to be any pointless bickering over this one.

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RE: Slow clap
by mdsama on Sun 3rd Jan 2016 03:08 UTC in reply to "Slow clap"
mdsama
Member since:
2005-07-08

Completely agree! I think... Why "slow clap"? That usually connotes sarcasm right?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Slow clap
by Morgan on Sun 3rd Jan 2016 05:13 in reply to "RE: Slow clap"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Why "slow clap"? That usually connotes sarcasm right?


Not originally. The sarcastic connotation is a modern thing, and like many "internet memes" it actually originated on Saturday Night Live[1].

[1] http://snltranscripts.jt.org/90/90lclapping.phtml

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Slow clap
by BeamishBoy on Mon 4th Jan 2016 05:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Slow clap"
BeamishBoy Member since:
2010-10-27

Not originally. The sarcastic connotation is a modern thing, and like many "internet memes" it actually originated on Saturday Night Live[1].


Completely untrue. Slow handclaps have been used, for example, to devastating effect for decades in the UK any time a trade union wishes to humiliate a government minister who happens to be giving a speech. The Women's Institute have been doing it for a long, long time and supporters of David Lloyd George used it as a device at political gatherings at least as far back as the early 1900s. It's also been a common occurrence at test cricket since at least the early 1930s.

Edited 2016-01-04 05:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Slow clap
by Carewolf on Mon 4th Jan 2016 18:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Slow clap"
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

It can be both. There are at least two common ways to do slow clap. The sarcastic slow clap, which is like a normal claping except slower, and mockingly polite but unimpressed, and the "OMG I can't believe this" slow clap, where you clap slower only because you are putting so much more force into each clap, the latter is sometimes also illustrated with a GIF from Citizen Kane.

Reply Parent Score: 3