Linked by Andrew Youll on Sat 19th Nov 2005 15:30 UTC, submitted by Andrew Bragdon
Microsoft BentUser reviews what is famous for being Microsoft's worst product of all time - and finds out just exactly what is so terrible about it.
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RE[3]: Don't Get the Dog
by henrikmk on Sun 20th Nov 2005 15:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Don't Get the Dog"
henrikmk
Member since:
2005-07-10

Replying to myself: I know the speech bubbles can be removed with TweakUI, but I think the initial design decision which results in, "I know it's annoying, but it can be removed with XYZ tool" just shows that it's a bad design decision to keep it.

Again XP offers many things that can be turned off in this manner, even from within its own interface: Webview of files in Explorer, the fancy view of Control Panel can be turned off, the fancy start menu can be turned off, the GUI can be reverted to Windows 2000 style.

Those are nice choices to have, but why are they necessary in the first place? Why would MS suddenly think that their new, colorful, unnecessarily rearranged GUI just might be confusing or annoying to all those (likely the majority of Windows PC users) who have migrated from older versions of Windows?

Why implement something that doesn't hold up anyway?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Don't Get the Dog
by n4cer on Sun 20th Nov 2005 17:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Don't Get the Dog"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Those are nice choices to have, but why are they necessary in the first place? Why would MS suddenly think that their new, colorful, unnecessarily rearranged GUI just might be confusing or annoying to all those (likely the majority of Windows PC users) who have migrated from older versions of Windows?

Why implement something that doesn't hold up anyway?


It's not that they know the new designs won't hold up or be confusing. It's because they target a wide audience from novices to business and power users, and know that what some like others won't no matter how little the change. And if it doesn't widely affect the type of experience they want the user to have, they'll allow the option of turning a feature off. Just reading this forum shows differences in opinion over the Agent/Search Assistants and most people here probably are just in the power user group (or consider themselves to be).

There's also the performance case. Allowing some features to be turned off can yield extra performance on low-end systems that can otherwise run the OS well. The tiered approach to Vista's UI is an example of this. Rather than requiring everyone to meet the specs for Glass, they offer a lower point of entry even though there are benefits to using the newer UI. XP also does this with automatic management of Visual Styles features based on system spec.

Reply Parent Score: 1