Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 13th Nov 2016 23:43 UTC
Windows

We all know the feeling. You just want to use some of your favourite 16bit Windows applications, only to realise that since you moved to 64bit, Windows no longer runs them. This gets me every time, probably 4-5 times a day. Every time I'm like - there's got to be a better way than firing up my old 386 laptop, or running an entire Windows 3.x VM just to get my daily fix of Skifree.

Right?

I jest, of course, but when Brad Robinson's partner, Jen, wanted to play some old 16bit Windows games, he did actually want to create a less frustrating user experience. So, he decided to write a Windows 3 emulator.

The basic idea is to write a program that can read a 16-bit Windows executable file, run it on an emulated CPU and map any 16-bit API calls that it makes onto the x64 equivalents.

The emulator itself isn't available just yet, but his series of articles on Medium detailing its development are fascinating reads.

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Nice!
by Mark0 on Mon 14th Nov 2016 02:39 UTC
Mark0
Member since:
2005-08-11

And speaking of 16bit emulators, this could also be of interest to someone:

http://takeda-toshiya.my.coocan.jp/msdos/index.html

"This is MS-DOS emulator running on Win32-x64 command prompt.
16bit MS-DOS compatible commands can be executed on Win32-x64 envrionment.
"

I used it with some mixed results, but worked great for some old compilers or other CLI tools like compressors/archivers.

Edited 2016-11-14 02:40 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Nice!
by ssokolow on Mon 14th Nov 2016 14:12 in reply to "Nice!"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

<span>And speaking of 16bit emulators, this could also be of interest to someone:

http://takeda-toshiya.my.coocan.jp/msdos/index.html

"This is MS-DOS emulator running on Win32-x64 command prompt.
16bit MS-DOS compatible commands can be executed on Win32-x64 envrionment.
"

I used it with some mixed results, but worked great for some old compilers or other CLI tools like compressors/archivers.


Huh. I don't read Japanese but it looks like it's probably a Windows analogue to dosemu, which I use for integrating things like Pacific C (from FreeDOS) into the build process for test files for an EXE parser I have planned.

(Since the EXE files generated by Pacific C cause /usr/bin/file to produce output distinct from any of the native Linux-to-DOS cross-compilers I've tried so far.)

Edited 2016-11-14 14:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2