Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Feb 2017 22:47 UTC, submitted by kragil
Legal

What did Vizio know about what was going on in the privacy of consumers' homes? On a second-by-second basis, Vizio collected a selection of pixels on the screen that it matched to a database of TV, movie, and commercial content. What's more, Vizio identified viewing data from cable or broadband service providers, set-top boxes, streaming devices, DVD players, and over-the-air broadcasts. Add it all up and Vizio captured as many as 100 billion data points each day from millions of TVs.

Vizio then turned that mountain of data into cash by selling consumers' viewing histories to advertisers and others. And let’s be clear: We're not talking about summary information about national viewing trends. According to the complaint, Vizio got personal. The company provided consumers' IP addresses to data aggregators, who then matched the address with an individual consumer or household. Vizio's contracts with third parties prohibited the re-identification of consumers and households by name, but allowed a host of other personal details - for example, sex, age, income, marital status, household size, education, and home ownership. And Vizio permitted these companies to track and target its consumers across devices.

That's... That's a lot of very creepy spying.

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Same old, same old
by wigry on Wed 8th Feb 2017 08:26 UTC
wigry
Member since:
2008-10-09

When I purchased my Sony Android TV and read through the agreement, it was clear that the TV would instantly make the same pixel collection and would send it back to manufacturer. Hence I declined the agreement and have refused to attach a network cable to my TV. It is obvious that by pixel hunting the service provider and equipment manufacturers can figure out exactly what are you watching and when. So it can be said, it is nothing new and I am sorry if someone have fallen into this trap and have thought that nobody would do such things. It is business and content providers and equipment manufacturers are desperately trying to cash in any source of revenue - dirty or clean.

Then why on earth did I buy SmartTV with Android in it? Well it was because of the Sony Panel and an excessive amount of picture adjustment possibilities. I've never cared about the OS inside the TV and continue to use it as a dumb TV with very good panel.

Edited 2017-02-08 08:38 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Same old, same old
by Alfman on Wed 8th Feb 2017 08:57 in reply to "Same old, same old"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Whether it's the TV/cable boxes/roku/PC/chromecast, we're all being tracked every which way these days. Users don't bother to fight it, and so we can expect that everything that can be monitored will be monitored for corporate exploitation.

Even employers are demanding access to social media profiles. People should stand up and say no, but between loosing privacy and loosing one's paycheck, some people may not feel they have a reasonable choice.

And it seems we've learned nothing from snowden either, US companies are subject to secret government orders and neither of our political parties respects privacy enough to hold the government accountable for unconstitutional wiretapping.

Welcome to the future.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Same old, same old
by kurkosdr on Wed 8th Feb 2017 09:58 in reply to "RE: Same old, same old"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

Whether it's the TV/cable boxes/roku/PC/chromecast, we're all being tracked every which way these days. Users don't bother to fight it, and so we can expect that everything that can be monitored will be monitored for corporate exploitation.


If you want any kind of "cloud" service that goes beyond the rock-bottom basic, you have to be tracked. There is no option to pay to be without it.

It's like the crap deal we get with mobile games. You can't get rid of microtransactions even if you are prepared to pay.

"Free" is profitable for corporations if it comes with gotchas, so companies won't let you pay even if you want to.

I don't mind the user tracking so all those "free" cloud services are heaven for me (with the exception of mobile games and microtransactions), but if it annoys you there is no way out of it beside using no "cloud" services beyond the rock-bottom basic.

Edited 2017-02-08 10:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3