Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Feb 2017 22:15 UTC
Games

When we consider any new features or changes for Steam, our primary goal is to make customers happy. We measure that happiness by how well we are able to connect customers with great content. We've come to realize that in order to serve this goal we needed to move away from a small group of people here at Valve trying to predict which games would appeal to vastly different groups of customers.

Thus, over Steam's 13-year history, we have gradually moved from a tightly curated store to a more direct distribution model. In the coming months, we are planning to take the next step in this process by removing the largest remaining obstacle to having a direct path, Greenlight. Our goal is to provide developers and publishers with a more direct publishing path and ultimately connect gamers with even more great content.

This is a big step for Steam, and will make it incredibly trivial for developers and publishers alike to publish games on Steam.

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RE[4]: Great
by ahferroin7 on Tue 14th Feb 2017 12:34 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
ahferroin7
Member since:
2015-10-30

I'm so used to buying and running only DRM-free as a matter of principle that I forgot about that being one of the reasons I started.

I'm not talking DRM encumbered stuff, I'm talking stuff that takes fascist approaches to preventing cheating that don't care about the security of the player's systems. Thankfully use of rootkits to stop cheating has largely subsided, but it's still out there.

As far as the stuff that requires running as an administrator, most of that in my experience is just poor design choices, not DRM.

Firejail and Bubblewrap are actually two different frontends to the same underlying mechanisms.

As is (almost) every sandboxing tool on Linux. I just mentioned firejail specifically since it's one of the easiest for normal users to set up since it doesn't require modifying the application at all and still provides full audio and 3D acceleration support.

As I understand it, the reason they both exist is that Firejail was developed before they split Bubblewrap out of Flatpak (then known as xdg-app) to be usable independently and Firejail development spends more effort trying to find ways to make unmodified applications amenable to sandboxing.

In general, yes, although from my limited knowledge of both, firejail is a bit easier to use if you're not a programmer. I'd argue though that sandboxing is significantly less useful to an end user if it requires the application to opt-in, which is a large part of why firejail still exists.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Great
by ssokolow on Tue 14th Feb 2017 22:10 in reply to "RE[4]: Great"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

I'm not talking DRM encumbered stuff, I'm talking stuff that takes fascist approaches to preventing cheating that don't care about the security of the player's systems. Thankfully use of rootkits to stop cheating has largely subsided, but it's still out there.


Point. I tend to get sloppy with my use of the term "DRM" these days.

That said, the intersection of games which require that stuff and games offered by GOG and Humble Bundles is an empty set. (In fact, I'm not even sure if anything in GOG's catalog has a multiplayer experience like that as n option.)

As far as the stuff that requires running as an administrator, most of that in my experience is just poor design choices, not DRM.


I run my games either natively on Linux, in Wine, in DOSBox, or on a quarantined Windows XP, Windows 98, or DOS622/Win311 retro-PC, so that's more a nicety than a requirement for security.


In general, yes, although from my limited knowledge of both, firejail is a bit easier to use if you're not a programmer. I'd argue though that sandboxing is significantly less useful to an end user if it requires the application to opt-in, which is a large part of why firejail still exists.


No argument there. I plan to Firejail almost everything as soon as I have time to upgrade from Kubuntu 14.04 LTS to one without problems like the PulseAudio compatibility flaw.

Reply Parent Score: 2