Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Feb 2017 12:33 UTC
Windows

European Union data protection watchdogs said on Monday they were still concerned about the privacy settings of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system despite the U.S. company announcing changes to the installation process.

The watchdogs, a group made up of the EU's 28 authorities responsible for enforcing data protection law, wrote to Microsoft last year expressing concerns about the default installation settings of Windows 10 and users' apparent lack of control over the company's processing of their data.

Remember Scroogled? Good times.

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RE[2]: Comment by ahferroin7
by ahferroin7 on Tue 21st Feb 2017 15:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by ahferroin7"
ahferroin7
Member since:
2015-10-30

Same here, but so long as we remain in the minority we may eventually be coerced into using it due to network effects (mostly work-related).

In my case, the only things I use Windows for are testing (at work) and gaming (and I'm not as dependent on it for that as I used to be now that Steam finally runs sanely on Linux).

It's worth pointing out though that some of the issues could be solved by not having such braindead defaults. The whole thing about TOS/DSCP marking being ignored originated because of older network hardware that choked on marked packets, and got kept so AD domains can control it through group policy, but the habit of ignoring it results in poor networking performance for quite a few applications.

Yep, any internet connection can be metered.

It seems to me the primary need for this is to combat problems that windows 10 created in the first place - hijacking bandwidth for itself and denying owners the ability to say no.

Most of the time cost is not an issue for me. The only case where it might be is when using my phone as a hotspot, and I rarely do that when using Windows.

For me, the bigger thing is that by marking a connection metered, you functionally make Windows updates manual instead of automatic on that network, which is big for me since I game a lot and the 'idle' detection that the update framework supposedly uses is absolute crap, so Windows will randomly start downloading updates in the middle of a match and send my latency to hell.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by ahferroin7
by Alfman on Tue 21st Feb 2017 17:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ahferroin7"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

ahferroin7,

Most of the time cost is not an issue for me. The only case where it might be is when using my phone as a hotspot, and I rarely do that when using Windows.

For me, the bigger thing is that by marking a connection metered, you functionally make Windows updates manual instead of automatic on that network, which is big for me since I game a lot and the 'idle' detection that the update framework supposedly uses is absolute crap, so Windows will randomly start downloading updates in the middle of a match and send my latency to hell.


Yea, we are both referring to the same thing.
Owners, not vendors, should be in control over the computers they own. Every few years we loose a little bit more control. When it comes to windows, we've been on the loosing edge for a long time.

Reply Parent Score: 3