Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Apr 2017 21:17 UTC
Windows

Released to manufacturing on November 8, 2006 and shipping to consumers on January 30, 2007, Windows Vista had a troubled development and a troubled life once it shipped. But it was an essential Windows release, laying the groundwork for Windows 7 and beyond. For all the criticism that Vista and Microsoft received, the company never really backtracked on the contentious aspects of the release. After a while, those aspects just stopped being contentious.

I reviewed Windows Vista way back in 2006 for OSNews, in two parts, followed by another look at the operating system five months later (my fascination with post-XP Windows started all the way back in 2003, when I wrote a Longhorn review for OSNews - three years before I actually joined the OSNews team).

The importance of Windows Vista cannot be overstated. In hindsight, it was probably the most important Windows release since Windows 95, as it was a massive overhaul of countless crucial aspects of Windows NT that we still use and rely on today. A new graphics stack, a new audio stack, a new networking stack, a complete overhaul and cleaning of the lowest-level parts of the kernel, and so much more.

Windows Vista ended many terrible design decisions from the XP and earlier days. No more kernel access for developers, a new driver model, no more programs running as administrator, and so on. Microsoft forced Windows users to bite the bullet and endure endless UAC dialogs, but it all paid off in the end.

And on a personal note, Windows Vista came after Windows XP, and Windows XP was one of the worst operating systems I have ever used. I despise Windows XP, and would rather use a $200 2005 Acer laptop with Vista than a fancy 2009 Sony VAIO or whatever running XP. Windows Vista set the scene for Windows 7 to murder Windows XP for good, and for that reason alone, Vista gets 56 thumbs up from me.

Vista was part of a very large undertaking inside Microsoft to completely overhaul the low-level parts of Windows, to prepare the platform for the next decade and beyond. It led to Windows 7, Windows Phone, Windows on the Xbox One, and countless other variants. Not all of those are or were successful, but each of them are still fruits of the incredible engineering work Microsoft's women and men undertook to salvage the architectural trainwreck that was Windows XP and earlier.

They did an absolutely amazing job, and on this day, I commend them for it.

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I ran Vista until very recently
by Temcat on Wed 12th Apr 2017 01:02 UTC
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

And I can say that on adequate hardware, it behaved well in my experience. I also like the UI better than Windows 7 (for the most part).

That said, XP was faster and did not present much trouble in terms of viruses or breakage if you knew what you were doing.

Reply Score: 3

sapere aude Member since:
2006-03-07

and did not present much trouble in terms of viruses or breakage if you knew what you were doing.


My memories are quite different...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaster_(computer_worm)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Sauron Member since:
2005-08-02

And I can say that on adequate hardware, it behaved well in my experience. I also like the UI better than Windows 7 (for the most part).

That said, XP was faster and did not present much trouble in terms of viruses or breakage if you knew what you were doing.


Very true. I still use a XP box now, and a Windows 2000 and a Win98SE one, all for different reasons and software that won't run on newer systems.
All 3 are internet connected but firewalled and have real time virus scanners installed. They have been virus and trouble free for years.
The biggest problem that even new systems won't solve or secure, is the users that willy nilly click on any link or open email attachments that's sent their way.
You can't protect against stupid!

Reply Parent Score: 4

BlueofRainbow Member since:
2009-01-06

Just curious, have you attempted the virtual machine route?

Maintaining a Win98SE system or even a W2K one is a bit scary - unless one has an inventory of spare parts or such replacement parts can be still be found.

Reply Parent Score: 4