Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 23rd May 2017 22:27 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems

A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.

This is sorcery - and art.

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RE: Sweet museum exhibit ...
by jockm on Wed 24th May 2017 14:35 UTC in reply to "Sweet museum exhibit ..."
jockm
Member since:
2012-12-22

Short of something like the KIM-1, or AIM-65, probably not. Just about anything with video generation circuitry is going to need to share a common clock multiplier with the CPU. 60KHz (max) isn't going to do that.

The exception would be video hardware that had it's own memory and communicated over a bus. The TMS9918 — the VDP in the TI 99/4A — would probably work, but I don't believe there were any 6502 systems of that vintage that used it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sweet museum exhibit ...
by Alfman on Wed 24th May 2017 15:15 in reply to "RE: Sweet museum exhibit ..."
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

jockm,

Short of something like the KIM-1, or AIM-65, probably not. Just about anything with video generation circuitry is going to need to share a common clock multiplier with the CPU. 60KHz (max) isn't going to do that.

The exception would be video hardware that had it's own memory and communicated over a bus. The TMS9918 — the VDP in the TI 99/4A — would probably work, but I don't believe there were any 6502 systems of that vintage that used it.


You could probably connect an active adapter with a microcontroller or fpga in between the slow CPU output and faster video scanline requirements. It could be considered cheating, but at least it should work and most people looking at it on display wouldn't really care about the adapter.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Sweet museum exhibit ...
by whartung on Wed 24th May 2017 18:05 in reply to "RE: Sweet museum exhibit ..."
whartung Member since:
2005-07-06

Short of something like the KIM-1, or AIM-65, probably not. Just about anything with video generation circuitry is going to need to share a common clock multiplier with the CPU. 60KHz (max) isn't going to do that.


It was nice seeing BASIC run on it, however. Pretty snappy for 60KHz.

It begs the question if the video is clocked properly (i.e. the CPU get the 60K clock, while the rest get their normal clock), would it work in, say, an Apple. I think it would be problematic in an Atari, the ANTIC could be pretty chatty in terms of interrupts and such.

I wonder how much power it uses, and I wonder if it's an electromagnetic white noise generator of any impact. My TV used to just snow up as soon as I powered up my KIM-1 board back in the day.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Sweet museum exhibit ...
by jockm on Thu 25th May 2017 01:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Sweet museum exhibit ..."
jockm Member since:
2012-12-22

The kim-1 was basically a radio antenna that could do computations. I have fond memories of that machine.

As for interfacing with an ANTIC, there is just no way a 60Hz system could keep up with it's requirements.

There are VDPs that you could interface with, but none of them were in common 6502 systems of the era

Reply Parent Score: 2